ENR 1.8Flugreglur og starfshættir flugumferðarþjónusta Rules of the air and air traffic services procedures

Viðaukastarfshættir (Doc 7030), flugreglur, flugumferðar-þjónusta og leit og björgun á Norður- Atlantshafi.NAT Regional Supplementary Procedures (Doc 7030), Rules of the Air, Air Traffic Services and Search and Rescue.
Þessir starfshættir eru til fyllingar þeim reglum sem eru í Annex 2, Annex 6, I. og II. hluta, PANS-ATM (Doc 4444-ATM/501) og PANS-OPS (Doc 8168-OPS/611).These Procedures are supplementary to the provisions contained in Annex 2, Annex 6, Parts I and II, Annex 11, PANS-ATM (Doc 4444-ATM/501) and PANS-OPS (Doc 8168-OPS/611).
Í staðarsvæðum umhverfis Ísland, Færeyjar og Grænland, sem ákveðin eru af viðkomandi yfirvöldum, gilda þessir viðaukastarfshættir ekki.They do not apply in the local areas established by the appropriate authorities around Iceland, the Faeroe Islands and in Greenland.
Ath.- Umrædd staðarsvæði eru innanlandsdeild flugstjórnar í Reykjavík (Domestic area) F245 og neðar. Staðarsvæðið sem er í 7500 fetum og neðar innan VAGAR TIZ þegar það svæði er opið. Þessi svæði eru bæði í flugupplýsingasvæði Reykjavíkur. Staðarsvæðið sem er í FL 195 og neðar í flugupplýsingasvæði Nuukí Grænlandi.Note - The local areas are the Domestic area F245 and below and at 7500 feet and below within VAGAR TIZ when active. Both areas are in the Reykjavik FIR. FL 195 and below in Greenland, Nuuk FIR.
Sérreglur sem gilda eingöngu í flugupplýsinga- og flugstjórnarsvæði Reykjavíkur eru auðkenndar með skáletri.Special rules applicable in Reykjavik FIR/CTA only are in italics.

ENR 1.8.1 Flugreglur - eingöngu á ensku Flight rules

Textinn hér á eftir er eingöngu á ensku.
ENR 1.8.1.1 Instrument flight rules (IFR)
(A2-2.2 and Chapter 5)
Note - Annex 2, 2.2 permits a choice for a flight to comply with either the instrument flight rules or the visual flight rules when operated in visual meteorological conditions subject to certain limitations in Chapter 4 of the Annex. The following indicates certain further restrictions to that choice.
ENR 1.8.1.1.1 Special application of instrument flight rules
Flights shall be conducted in accordance with the instrument flight rules (even when not operating in instrument meteorological conditions) when operated at or above FL 60 or 2 000 feet (600 m) above ground, whichever is the higher, within:
  1. the New York Oceanic, Gander Oceanic, Shanwick Oceanic, Santa Maria Oceanic, Nuuk and Reykjavik flight information regions, and
  2. the Bodö Oceanic flight information region when operated more than 100 NM seaward from the shoreline.

ENR 1.8.2 Airspaces with special requirements

ENR 1.8.2.1 High Level Airspace (HLA)
ENR 1.8.2.1.1 Area of applicability
(A2 - 5.1.1; A6, Part I - 4.2, 7.2 and Chapter 3, Note 1; A6, part II - Section 3. NAT DOC 7030. NAT DOC007)
The NAT HLA is the volume of airspace between FL 285 and FL 420 within the oceanic control areas of Bodo Oceanic, Gander Oceanic, New York Oceanic East, Reykjavik, Santa Maria and Shanwick, excluding the Shannon and Brest Ocean Transition Areas. See map ENR 6.1 - 9.
ENR 1.8.2.1.2 Method of application
ENR 1.8.2.1.2.1
HLA Approval
A large portion of the airspace of the North Atlantic Region, between FLs 285 and 420 inclusive, is designated as the NAT High Level Airspace (NAT HLA). Within this airspace a formal Approval Process by the State of Registry of the aircraft or the State of the Operator ensures that aircraft meet defined NAT HLA Standards and that appropriate crew procedures and training have been adopted.
Aircraft not meeting these requirements shall not be allowed to operate in HLA unless the following conditions are satisfied:
  1. The aircraft is being provided with ATS surveillance service;
  2. Direct controller-pilot VHF voice communication is maintained; and
  3. The aircraft has a certified installation of equipment providing it the ability to navigate along the cleared track.
An operator who experiences reduced navigation performance shall inform air traffic control (ATC) as soon as practicable.
When granting approval for operations in HLA, States of Registry or the State of the Operator, as appropriate, shall ensure that:
  1. in-flight operating drills include mandatory navigation cross-checking procedures which will identify navigation errors in sufficient time to prevent the aircraft inadvertently deviating from the ATC-cleared route.
  2. the operator has established programmes to provide for the continued airworthiness of aircraft navigation systems necessary to navigate to the degree of accuracy required;
  3. the operator has established procedures to ensure flight crews have adequate knowledge of the current provisions regarding:
    1. the position reporting procedures;
    2. mandatory carriage of the NAT OTS message; and
    3. the NAT special procedures.
Note 1 - Guidance material of use to those who intend to operate aircraft in the ICAO NAT Region is provided in the North Atlantic Operations and Airspace Manual (NAT Doc 007).
Note 2 - The Performance-based Navigation (PBN) Manual (Doc 9613) provides guidance on aircraft, operations and maintenance programmes for the initial achievement and continued compliance with the authorized navigation specification, including programmes for avoiding navigational errors.
State Approvals for NAT MNPSA operations granted prior to 4th of February 2016 will be valid for NAT HLA operations. Except that those Approvals issued prior to 01 January 2015 and based upon the earlier "6.3 NMs" MNPS standard will not be valid beyond January 2020. Any NAT MNPS Approvals granted using PBN specifications for navigation equipment performance will continue to be valid beyond that date.
Only aircraft approved for RNP 4 or RNAV 10 (RNP 10) shall be eligible for a new MNPS specific approval.
ENR 1.8.2.1.2.2
Monitoring
Adequate monitoring of flight operations in the NAT Region shall be conducted in order to assist in the assessment of continuing compliance of aircraft with the lateral navigation capabilities specified in NAT DOC007.
Note - Monitoring will be conducted in accordance with the appropriate guidance material issued by ICAO
ENR 1.8.2.1.2.3
Reduced navigation performance
An operator who experiences reduced navigation performance shall inform air traffic control (ATC) as soon as practicable.
ENR 1.8.2.1.2.4
None HLA approved aircraft
Aircraft not approved for operation in HLA may be cleared by the responsible ATC unit to climb or descend through HLA provided:
  1. the climb is completed within the usable coverage of selected VOR/DMEs or NDBs and/or within ATS Surveillance coverage of the ATC unit issuing such clearance and the aircraft is able to maintain Direct Controller/Pilot Communication (DCPC) on VHF, and
  2. HLA MNPS approved aircraft operating in that part of the HLA affected by such climbs or descents are not penalised.
Non-HLA MNPS approved aircraft may also be cleared to climb or descend through HLA for the sole purpose of landing at or departing from an airport which underlies HLA but which does not have serviceable short range navaids, ATS Surveillance or DCPC.
ENR 1.8.2.1.2.5
Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs)
While not a specific element of NAT HLA MNPS approval, pilots and operators are reminded that for flights over the NAT, ICAO SARPS Annex 6, Part 1, Chapter 6, requires carriage of Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs). It should be further noted that new specifications for these beacons to operate exclusively on frequency 406 MHz (but with a 121.5 MHz search and rescue homing capability) have been in effect since January 2005. New aircraft have been required to be so equipped since 2005.
ENR 1.8.2.1.2.6
Indication of HLA State approval in FPL
Compliance with high level airspace minimum navigation performance (HLA MNPS) specification.
For flights intending to operate within HLA during any portion of their flight, the letter "X" shall be inserted after the letter "S" in Item 10a of the flight plan, indicating that the flight has been certificated as complying with the HLA MNPS.
ENR 1.8.2.1.3 Reference, guidance and information material concerning air navigation in the NAT Region
ENR 1.8.2.1.3.1
Routes for aircraft with only one Long Range Navigation System (LRNS)
  1. A number of special routes have been developed for aircraft equipped with only one LRNS and carrying normal short-range navigation equipment (VOR, DME, ADF), which are required to cross the North Atlantic between Europe and North America (or vice versa). These routes are within the NAT HLA, and that State approval must be obtained prior to flying along them. These routes are also available for interim use by aircraft normally approved for unrestricted NAT HLA operations that have suffered a partial loss of navigation capability and have only a single remaining functional LRNS.
    If this single LRNS is a GPS it must be approved in accordance with FAA TSO-C129 or later standard as Class A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 or C2, or with equivalent EASA documentation ETSO- C129a. Some States may have additional requirements regarding the carriage and use of GPS (e.g. a requirement for FDE RAIM) and pilots should check with their own State of Registry to ascertain what, if any, they are.
    These above mentioned documents can be found at:
    http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgWebcomponents.nsf
    and
    http://www.easa.europa.eu/ws_prod/g/doc/Agency_Mesures/Certification Spec/CS-ETSO.pdf
  2. Routes a) to k) are known as "Blue Spruce" routes and it has been determined that continuous VHF coverage exists on these routes at FL 310 and above except as specified below:
    1. ATSIX (60N 010W) - 6100N 01234W - ALDAN - KFV, (VHF coverage exists but HF is required on this route)
    2. RATSU (61N 010W) - ALDAN - KFV, (VHF coverage exists. Non HF equipped aircraft can use this route)
    3. GOMUP (57N 010W) - 60N 015W - 61N 01630W - BREKI - KFV, (VHF coverage does not exist between GOMUP and 60N 015W, HF is required on this route)
    4. MOXAL - RATSU
    5. OSKUM - RATSU
    6. KFV - SOPEN - DA - SF - YFB
    7. KFV - EPENI - 63N 030W - 61N 040W - OZN
    8. OZN - 59N 050W - AVUTI - PRAWN - YDP
    9. OZN - 59N 050W - CUDDY - PORGY - HO
    10. OZN - 58N 050W - HOIST - YYR.
    11. SF - DARUB (67N 060W) - YXP
    12. KU - EPMAN (66N 060W) - YXP
    13. KU - 64N 060W - MUSVA (64N 063W) - YFB; and
    14. RE - 6930N 02240W - CP.
ENR 1.8.2.1.3.2
Routes for aircraft with Short Range Navigation Equipment
The following routes may be flown with short range navigation equipment (VOR/DME, ADF), but State approval for operation within HLA is still necessary.
  1. VALDI - MY - ING - KFV (G3)
  2. PEMOS - MY (G11)
ENR 1.8.2.1.3.3
Procedures for aircraft suffering partial loss of navigation capability before entry into HLA
ICAO Annex 6, Parts I and II, Chapter 7, state a requirement for aeroplanes to be sufficiently provided with navigation equipment to ensure that, in the event of the failure of one item of equipment at any stage of flight, the remaining equipment will enable the aeroplane to proceed in accordance with HLA where applicable. For flight in NAT HLA, this is interpreted to mean that, while two sets of long range navigation equipment have to be carried when operating in the major part of the HLA, there are routes on which only one set of long range navigation equipment has to be carried and on which the requirement for stand-by equipment is satisfied by the carriage of approved short range navigation equipment. In the event of an aircraft suffering partial loss of navigation capability prior to entry into oceanic airspace (e.g. only one INS or FMS/IRS serviceable), the pilot should consider using one of the special routes listed above. Use of these routes following partial loss of navigation capability is subject to the following criteria:
  1. sufficient navigation capability remains to meet the HLA, i.e. one LNRS plus short range navigation aids;
  2. the requirement of ICAO Annex 6, Parts I and II, Chapter 7 with regard to the provision of navigation equipment necessary to enable the aeroplane to be navigated in accordance with its operational flight plan and the requirements of ATS, can be met by relying on the use of short range navigation aids in the event of failure of the remaining LRNS;
  3. a revised flight plan is filed with the appropriate ATS unit; and
  4. an appropriate ATC clearance is obtained.
Note - A revised oceanic ATC clearance will be issued after co-ordination between all OACs concerned. Should the OTS at the time of the incident extend to the northern part of the NAT Region, the aircraft concerned may be required to accept a lower than optimum flight level in its revised oceanic clearance, especially during peak traffic periods. The above guidance material does not relieve the pilot of the obligation to take the best possible course of action under the prevailing circumstances.
ENR 1.8.2.1.4 Monitoring of Navigation Accuracies
The horizontal (i.e. latitudinal and longitudinal) and vertical navigation performance of operators within NAT HLA is monitored on a continual basis. If a deviation is identified, follow-up action after flight is taken, both with the operator and the State of Registry of the aircraft involved, to establish the cause of the deviation and to confirm the approval of the flight to operate in NAT HLA. The overall navigation performance of all aircraft in the HLA is compared to the standards established for the Region, to ensure that the relevant Target Levels of Safety (TLSs) are being maintained.
ENR 1.8.2.2 Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM)
ENR 1.8.2.2.1 Area of applicability
All aircraft intending to operate within the NAT HLA must be equipped with altimetry and height-keeping systems which meet RVSM Minimum Aircraft System Performance Specifications (MASPS). RVSM MASPS are contained in ICAO Doc 9574 and detailed in designated FAA document, AC91-85 (latest edition), and in equivalent Joint Aviation Authority (JAA) documentation. See map ENR 6.1 - 9.
ENR 1.8.2.2.2 Method of application
  1. RVSM Approval
    Pilots intending to fly within RVSM Airspace shall be in possession of the appropriate RVSM Approval issued by the State of Registry of the aircraft or by the State of the Operator.
  2. Equipment
    The aircraft shall be equipped with altimetry and height-keeping systems which meet RVSM Minimum Aircraft System Performance Specifications (MASPS). RVSM MASPS are contained in ICAO Doc 9574.
  3. Responsibility
    The above referenced Documents, are provided to assist States of Registry, operators, owners and planning staff who are responsible for issuing or obtaining RVSM approvals for aircraft. However, the ultimate responsibility for checking that a NAT RVSM flight has the necessary approval(s) rests with the pilot in command. In the case of most regular scheduled flights this check is a matter of simple routine but pilots of special charter flights, private flights, ferry and delivery flights are advised to pay particular attention to this matter. Routine monitoring of NAT traffic regularly reveals examples of pilots of non-approved flights, from within these user groups, flight planning or requesting clearance within RVSM Airspace. All such instances are prejudicial to safety and are referred to relevant State Authorities for further action.
    Aircraft not meeting these requirements shall not be allowed to operate in airspace where reduced vertical separation minimum is being applied.
  4. Monitoring
    Adequate monitoring of flight operations in the NAT Region shall be conducted in order to assist in the assessment of continuing compliance of aircraft with height-keeping capabilities.
  5. NON-RVSM approved aircraft
    Special arrangements for NON-RVSM approved aircraft
    1. To Climb/Descend Through RVSM Levels
      Aircraft that are not approved for RVSM operation will be permitted, subject to traffic, to climb/descend through RVSM levels in order to attain cruising levels above or below RVSM airspace. Flights should climb/descend continuously through the RVSM levels without stopping at any intermediate level and should "Report leaving" current level and "Report reaching" cleared level. Such aircraft are also permitted to flight plan and operate at FL430 either Eastbound or Westbound above RVSM Airspace.
    2. To Operate at RVSM Levels
      ATC may provide special approval for an HLA MNPS approved aircraft that is not approved for RVSM operation to fly in HLA provided that the aircraft:
      1. is on a delivery flight; or
      2. was RVSM approved but has suffered an equipment failure and is being returned to its base for repair and/or re-approval; or
      3. is on a mercy or humanitarian flight.
    3. Request prior approval
      Operators requiring such special approval should request prior approval by contacting the initial Oceanic Area Control Centre (OAC), normally not more than 12 hours and not less than 4 hours prior to the intended departure time, giving as much detail as possible regarding acceptable flight levels and routings. Operators should be aware, due to the requirements to provide non-RVSM separation, that requested levels and/or routes may not always be available (especially when infringing active OTS systems). The special approval, if and when received, should be clearly indicated in Item 18 of the ICAO flight plan. Operators must appreciate that the granting of any such approval does not constitute an oceanic clearance, which must be obtained from ATC, by the pilot, in the normal manner. The service will not be provided to aircraft that are not approved for HLA MNPS operations.
ENR 1.8.2.3 Data link mandated airspace
ENR 1.8.2.3.1 Area of applicability
The NAT Data Link Mandate (DLM) airspace is being implemented in phases. The second step of Phase 2 (Phase 2b) has already been implemented at FL350 to FL390 (inclusive) throughout the ICAO NAT region.
The phases that remains to be implemented is phase 2C, commencing 30 January 2020: FL290 and above throughout the ICAO NAT Region.
ENR 1.8.2.3.2 Airspace Not Included in NAT Region DLM Airspace
  1. Airspace north of 80° North.
  2. New York Oceanic East FIR.
  3. Airspace where an ATS surveillance service is provided by means of radar, multilateration and/or ADS-B coupled with VHF voice communications services, provided the aircraft is suitably equipped transponder/ADS-B extended squitter transmitter.
    For flight planning purposes in BIRD CTA, this exclusion area is bounded by the following coordinates:
    Northern boundary: 65N000W - 67N010W - 69N020W - 68N030W - 67N040W - 69N050W - 69N060W - BOPUT.
    Southern boundary: GUNPA (61N000W) - 61N007W - 6040N010W - RATSU (61N010W) - 61N020W - 63N030W - 62N040W - 61N050W - SAVRY.
    Tracks wholly contained within this airspace (including its northern and southern boundaries) are excluded from the mandate.
    Note 1 - The airspace west of 030W within BIRD is ADS-B only and is excluded from the Data Link Mandate only for aircraft with functioning ADS-B equipment.
    Note 2 - ATS may, on a tactical basis, clear non-datalink aircraft which are being provided an ATS surveillance service to operate at DLM levels outside the exclusion area specified above.
    A depiction of the estimated extent of ATS surveillance airspace considered to be exempt from the DLM in the NAT region can be found in NAT common DLM AIC (http://www.icao.int/EURNAT/Pages/welcome.aspx (EUR/NAT Documents → NAT Documents → NAT OPS Bulletins)).
  4. Specific areas as agreed through the NAT SPG (e.g. Tango routes). Further information regarding these routes can be found in NAT common DLM AIC.
ENR 1.8.2.3.3 Flights Allowed To Flight Plan into NAT Region DLM Airspace
The following flights are permitted to flight plan to enter the NAT DLM airspace:
  1. Flights equipped with and prepared to operate FANS 1/A (or equivalent) CPDLC and ADS-C data link systems. (NAT Regional Supplementary Procedures (ICAO Doc 7030) paragraphs 3.4.2 and 5.5.2 apply for CPDLC and ADS-C respectively.); The appropriate equipage to be indicated in Item 10 (equipment and capabilities) of the ICAO flight plan is as follows:
    1. D1 (ADS-C with FANS 1/A capabilities); and
    2. J2 (CPDLC FANS 1/A HFDL); and/or
    3. J5 (CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (INMARSAT)); and/or
    4. J7 (CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (Iridium)).
  2. Non-equipped flights that file STS/FFR, HOSP, HUM, MEDEVAC, SAR or STATE in Item 18 of the flight plan. (Depending on the tactical situation at the time of flight, however, such flights may not receive an ATC clearance which fully corresponds to the requested flight profile.)
ENR 1.8.2.3.4 Operational Policies Applicable To NAT Region DLM Airspace
  1. Any aircraft not equipped with FANS 1/A (or equivalent) systems may request a continuous climb or descent without intermediate level off to climb or descend through the NAT DLM airspace. Such requests will be considered on a tactical basis. This provision will not be applicable after commencement of Phase 2C.
  2. ALTRV requests will be considered on a case by case basis irrespective of the equipage status of the participating aircraft.
  3. If a flight experiences an equipment failure PRIOR TO DEPARTURE which renders the aircraft non-DLM compliant, the flight should flight plan so as to remain clear of NAT Regional DLM Airspace.
  4. If a flight experiences an equipment failure AFTER DEPARTURE which renders the aircraft unable to operate FANS 1/A (or equivalent) CPDLC and/or ADS-C systems, requests to operate in the NAT DLM Airspace will be considered on a tactical basis. Such flights must notify ATC of their status PRIOR TO ENTERING the airspace.
  5. If a FANS 1/A data link equipment failure occurs while the flight is OPERATING WITHIN NAT DLM AIRSPACE, ATC must be immediately advised. Such flights may be re-cleared so as to avoid the airspace, but consideration will be given to allowing the flight to remain in the airspace, based on tactical considerations.
  6. NAT DLM airspace restrictions are not applicable to aircraft experiencing a contingency situation.
Note - Additional guidance can be found in the ICAO NAT Doc 007 North Atlantic Operations and Airspace Manual on the ICAO NAT Region site http://www.icao.int/EURNAT/Pages/welcome.aspx (EUR/NAT Documents → NAT Documents → NAT Doc 007).
ENR 1.8.2.4 Performance Based Communication and Surveillance (PBCS)
Reykjavik applies lateral and longitudinal PBCS dependent separation minima for PBCS approved aircraft within BIRD CTA, see ENR 1.8.9.
Coverage limitations to the service are:
  • Inmarsat SATCOM equipped aircraft: The service is limited to the airspace at or south of 80N.
  • Iridium SATCOM equipped aircraft: There is no coverage limitation.
The PBCS services are provided in accordance with specifications in the ICAO Performance Based Communication and Surveillance Manual (ICAO Doc 9869).
Communication is by means of FANS 1/A CPDLC - RCP240 - operators shall insert FPL indicator "P2" in item 10a to indicate PBCS approval.
Surveillance is by means of FANS 1/A ADS-C - RSP 180 - operators shall insert FPL indicator "RSP180" in Item 18 SUR/ subfield to indicate PBCS approval.
Backup means of communication and surveillance are:
  • HF voice or SATVOICE.
  • VHF voice and ATS surveillance within coverage see coverage charts in ENR 6.1.
RCP 240 and RSP 180 compliant aircraft operators must participate in the PBCS monitoring program.
ENR 1.8.2.4.1 Operational approval
Icelandic AOC holders need to obtain Operational approval for the inclusion in PBCS operations according to ICETRA FRD-042 application process.

ENR 1.8.3 The Organised Track System (OTS)

(NAT DOC007 Chapter 2)
ENR 1.8.3.1 Introduction
As a result of passenger demand, time zone differences and airport noise restrictions, much of the North Atlantic (NAT) air traffic contributes to two major alternating flows: a westbound flow departing Europe in the morning, and an eastbound flow departing North America in the evening. The effect of these flows is to concentrate most of the traffic unidirectionally, with peak westbound traffic crossing the 30W longitude between 1130 UTC and 1900 UTC and peak eastbound traffic crossing the 30W longitude between 0100 UTC and 0800 UTC.
Due to the constraints of large horizontal separation criteria and a limited economical height band (FL310-400) the airspace is congested at peak hours. In order to provide the best service to the bulk of the traffic, a system of organised tracks is constructed to accommodate as many flights as possible within the major flows on or close to their minimum time tracks and altitude profiles. Due to the energetic nature of the NAT weather patterns, including the presence of jet streams, consecutive eastbound and westbound minimum time tracks are seldom identical. The creation of a different organised track system is therefore necessary for each of the major flows. Separate organised track structures are published each day for eastbound and westbound flows. These track structures are referred to as the Organised Track System or OTS.
It should be appreciated, however, that use of OTS tracks is not mandatory. Currently about half of NAT flights utilise the OTS. Aircraft may fly on random routes which remain clear of the OTS or may fly on any route that joins or leaves an outer track of the OTS. There is also nothing to prevent an operator from planning a route which crosses the OTS. However, in this case, operators must be aware that whilst ATC will make every effort to clear random traffic across the OTS at published levels, re-routes or significant changes in flight level from those planned are very likely to be necessary during most of the OTS traffic periods.

ENR 1.8.4 Flight Plans

Submission of flight plans
(A2-3.3.1; P-ATM, Part 4.4)
Flight plans for flights departing from points within adjacent regions and entering the NAT Region without intermediate stops shall be submitted as early as possible.
ENR 1.8.4.1 Contents of ICAO Flight Plan - North Atlantic (NAT) Region
ENR 1.8.4.1.1 Introduction
The purpose of this guidance material is to remind users of how important the correct completion of the Flight Plan form has become in these days of automatic data processing. Incorrect completion of the Flight Plan may well result in delay to processing and subsequently to the flight.
ENR 1.8.4.1.2 Instructions for the completion of the ICAO Flight Plan form
  1. USE BLOCK CAPITALS.
  2. Adhere to the prescribed formats and manner of specifying data.
  3. Insert all clock times in 4 figures, UTC.
  4. Shaded areas preceding Item 3 - to be completed by ATS and COM services unless the responsibility for originating flight plan messages has been delegated.
  5. Complete Items 3 to 19 as indicated hereunder.
  6. Do not introduce obliques or spaces where they are not required.
Note 1 - SIDs and STARs are not required in the flight plan for flights operating in the NAT Region.
Note 2 - Flight planning requirements for BIRD domestic airspace is to be found in ENR 1.10.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3 Contents of each ITEM in the ICAO FPL form
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.1
ITEM 3: MESSAGE TYPE
INSERT: Enter FPL for any initial filing of a Flight Plan. For filing of second or subsequent flight plans, use either the "CHANGE" (CHG) or "CANCEL" (CNL) format as outlined in ICAO Doc 4444, but include field 18 to ensure automatic data transfer.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.2
ITEM 7: AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION
(Maximum 7 alphanumeric characters and without hyphens or symbols).
INSERT:one of the following aircraft identifications, not exceeding 7 characters:
  1. the ICAO designator for the aircraft operating agency followed by the flight identification (e.g. KLM511, NGA213, JTR25) when in radiotelephony the call sign to be used by the aircraft will consist of the ICAO telephony designator for the operating agency followed by the flight identification (e.g. KLM 511, NIGERIA 213, JESTER 25);
  2. the nationality or common mark and registration marking of the aircraft (e.g. EIAKO, 4XBCD, N2567GA) when:
    1. in radiotelephony the call sign used by the aircraft will consist of this identification alone (e.g. CGAJS), or preceded by the ICAO telephony designator for the aircraft operating agency (e.g. BLIZZARD CGAJS);
    2. the aircraft is not equipped with radio,
Note 1 - Standards for nationality, common and registration marks to be used are contained in Annex 7, Chapter 2.
Note 2 - Provisions for the use of radiotelephony call signs are contained in Annex 10, Volume II, Chapter 5. ICAO designators and telephony designators for aircraft operating agencies are contained in Doc 8585 - Designators for Aircraft Operating Agencies, Aeronautical Authorities and Services
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.3
ITEM 8: FLIGHT RULES AND TYPE OF FLIGHT
FLIGHT RULES
INSERT: one of the following letters to denote the category of flight rules with which the pilot intends to comply:
I if it is intended that the entire flight will be operated under the IFR
V if it is intended that the entire flight will be operated under the VFR
Y if the flight initially will be operated under the IFR, followed by one or more subsequent changes of flight rules or
Z if the flight initially will be operated under the VFR, followed by one or more subsequent changes of flight rules
Specify in Item 15 the point or points at which a change of flight rules is planned.
TYPE OF FLIGHT
INSERT:one of the following letters to denote the type of flight:
S if Scheduled Air Transport
N if Non-scheduled Air Transport
G if General Aviation
M if Military
X if other than any of the defined categories above
Specify status of a flight following the indicator STS in Item 18, or when necessary to denote other reasons for specific handling by ATS, indicate the reason following the indicator RMK in Item 18.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.4
ITEM 9: NUMBER AND TYPE OF AIRCRAFT AND WAKE TURBULENCE CATEGORY
NUMBER OF AIRCRAFT.
INSERT: the number of aircraft, if more than one.
TYPE OF AIRCRAFT.
INSERT: the appropriate designator as specified in ICAO Doc 8643, "Aircraft Type Designators".
or
INSERT: if no such designator has been assigned or in case of formation flights comprising more than one type, INSERT ZZZZ, and SPECIFY in Item 18, the (numbers and) type(s) of aircraft preceded by TYP/.
WAKE TURBULENCE CATEGORY.
INSERT: an oblique stroke followed by one of the following letters to indicate the wake turbulence category of the aircraft:
H - HEAVY, to indicate an aircraft type with maximum certificated take-off mass of 136 000 kg (300 000 lb) or more.
M - MEDIUM, to indicate an aircraft type with a maximum certificated take-off mass of less than 136 000 kg (300 000 lb) but more than 7000 kg (15 500 lb).
L - LIGHT, to indicate an aircraft type with a maximum certificated take-off mass of 7 000 kg (15 500 lb) or less.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.5
ITEM 10: EQUIPMENT AND CAPABILITIES
Capabilities comprise the following elements:
  1. presence of relevant serviceable equipment on board the aircraft;
  2. equipment and capabilities commensurate with flight crew qualifications; and
  3. where applicable, authorization from the appropriate authority
Radio communication, navigation and approach aid equipment and capabilities.
INSERT: one letter as follows:
N if no COM/NAV/Approach aid equipment for the route to be flown is carried, or the equipment is unserviceable,
or
S if the prescribed COM/NAV/Approach aid equipment for the route to be flown is carried and serviceable
and/or
INSERT: one or more of the following letters to indicate the serviceable COM/NAV/Approach aid equipment available and serviceable:
A - GBAS landing system
B - LPV (APV with SBAS)
C - LORAN C
D - DME
E1- FMC WPR ACARS
E2 -D-FIS ACARS
E3 - PDC ACARS
F - ADF
G - GNSS If any portion of the flight is planned to be conducted under IFR it refers to GNSS receivers that comply with the requirements of Annex 10, Volume I (See Note 2)
H - HF RTF
I - INERTIAL NAVIGATION
J1 - CPDLC ATN VDL Mode 2 (See Note 3)
J2 - CPDLC FANS 1/A HFDL
J3 - CPDLC FANS 1/A VDL Mode A
J4 - CPDLC FANS 1/A VDL Mode 2
J5 - CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (INMARSAT)
J6 - CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (MTSAT)
J7 - CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (Iridium)
Note: All aircraft planning to operate in the NAT Region and intending to use data link services shall insert the appropriate descriptor (J2, J5 or J7) in Item 10a.
K - MLS
L - ILS
M1 - ATC SATVOICE (INMARSAT)
M2 - ATC SATVOICE (MTSAT)
M3 - ATC SATVOICE (Iridium)
O - VOR
P1 CPDLC RCP 400
P2 CPDLC RCP 240
P3 SATVOICE RCP 400
P4-P9 Reserved for RCP
R - PBN approved (see Note 4) - all RNAV 10 (RNP 10) and/or RNP 4 approved aircraft intending to operate in the NAT Region shall insert the letter R in Item 10a of the flight plan.
T - TACAN
U - UHF RTF
V - VHF RTF
W - RVSM approved - all RVSM-approved aircraft intending to operate in the NAT Region
regardless of the requested flight level shall insert the letter "W" in item 10a of the flight plan.
X - HLA MNPS approved - all HLA MNPS-approved aircraft intending to operate in the NAT Region shall insert the letter "X" in item 10a of the flight plan.
Y - VHF with 8.33 KHz channel spacing capability
Z - other equipment carried or other capabilities (see Note 5)
Any alphanumeric characters not indicated above are reserved.
Note 1 - If a letter S is used, standard equipment is considered to be VHF RTF, VOR and ILS.
Note 2 - If the letter G is used, the types of external GNSS augmentation, if any, are specified in Item 18 following the indicator NAV/ and separated by a space.
When the letter G is filed, the pilot has the obligation to check RAIM prediction for the filed route before departure. Furthermore the pilot is obliged to report to ATC as soon as possible if receiving RAIM warning. Isavia is providing information on the Internet for RAIM prediction.
The address is: http://www.isavia.is/c.
Text used when advising that insufficient RAIM coverage has been predicted will be "GPS RAIM UNAVBL FOR NPA" The information will also be distributed as NOTAM.
Note 3 - See RTCA/EUROCAE Interoperability Requirements Standard For ATN Baseline 1 (ATN B1 INTEROP Standard - DO-280B/ED-110B) for data link services air traffic control clearance and information/air traffic control communications management/air traffic control microphone check.
Note 4 - If the letter R is used, the performance based navigation levels that can be met are specified in Item 18 following the indicator PBN/. Guidance material on the application of performance based navigation to a specific route segment, route or area is contained in the Performance-Based Navigation Manual (Doc 9613).
Note 5 - Z is used, specify in Item 18 the other equipment carried or other capabilities, preceded by COM/ NAV/ and or DAT, as appropriate.
Note 6 - Information on navigation capability is provided to ATC for clearance and routing purposes.
Surveillance EQUIPMENT and capabilities.
INSERT N if no surveillance equipment for the route to be flown is carried, or the equipment is unserviceable,
OR
INSERT: one or more of the following descriptors, to a maximum of 20 characters, to describe the serviceable surveillance equipment and/or capabilities on board:
SSR Modes A and C
A - Transponder Mode A (4 digits - 4 096 Codes)
C - Transponder Mode A (4 digits - 4 096 Codes) and Mode C
SSR Mode S
E Transponder - Mode S, including aircraft identification, pressure-altitude and extended squitter (ADS-B) capability
H Transponder - Mode S, including aircraft identification, pressure-altitude and enhanced surveillance capability
I Transponder - Mode S, including aircraft identification, but no pressure-altitude capability
L Transponder - Mode S, including aircraft identification, pressure-altitude, extended squitter (ADS-B) and enhanced surveillance capability
P - Transponder Mode S including pressure altitude transmission but no aircraft identification capability
S - Transponder Mode S including both pressure altitude and aircraft identification capability
X - Transponder - Mode S with neither aircraft identification nor pressure-altitude capability
Note - Enhanced surveillance capability is the ability of the aircraft to down-link aircraft derived data via a Mode S transponder.
ADS-B
B1 ADS-B with dedicated 1090 MHz ADS-B "out" capability
B2 ADB-B with dedicated 1090 MHz ADS-B "out" and "in" capability
U1 ADS-B "out" capability using UAT
U2 ADS-B "out" and "in" capability using UAT
V1 ADS-B "out" capability using VDL Mode 4
V2 ADS-B "out" and "in" capability using VDL Mode 4
ADS-C
D1 ADS-C with FANS 1/A capabilities
G1 ADS-C with ATN capabilities
Alphanumeric characters not indicated above are reserved.
Example: ADE3RV/HB2U2V2G1
Note - Additional surveillance application should be listed in Item 18 following the indicator SUR/
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.6
ITEM 13: DEPARTURE AERODROME AND TIME
INSERTthe ICAO four-letter Location indicator of the aerodrome of departure as specified in Doc 7910, Location Indicators
OR,if no location indicator has been assigned,
INSERTZZZZ, and SPECIFY, in Item 18, the name and location of the aerodrome, preceded by DEP/,
OR, the first point of the route or the marker radio beacon preceded by DEP/…, if the aircraft has not taken off from the aerodrome,
OR,if the flight plan is received from an aircraft in flight,
INSERTAFIL, and SPECIFY, in Item 18, the ICAO four-letter location indicator of the location of the ATS unit from which supplementary flight plan data can be obtained, preceded by DEP/.
THEN, WITHOUT A SPACE,
INSERTfor a flight plan submitted before departure, the estimated off-block time (EOBT),
OR,for a flight plan received from an aircraft in flight, the actual or estimated time over the first point of the route to which the flight plan applies.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.7
ITEM 15: ROUTE
INSERT the first cruising speed as in (1) and the first cruising level as in (2), without a space between them.
THEN, following the arrow, INSERT the route description as in (3).
  1. Cruising speed (maximum 5 characters) INSERT: For turbo-jet aircraft intending to operate within the Bodö Oceanic, Gander Oceanic, New York Oceanic, Reykjavik, Santa Maria Oceanic and Shanwick Oceanic control areas, the Mach number planned to be used for any portion of their flight shall be specified in ITEM 15 of the flight plan. All other aircraft: speed in terms of TAS. In both cases, the speed is to be indicated at either the last domestic reporting point prior to oceanic entry or the ocean entry control area boundary.
  2. Cruising level (maximum 5 characters)INSERT: Flight level, expressed as F followed by 3 figures (e.g. F080; F330), for ocean entry, specified at either the last domestic reporting point prior to ocean entry or the ocean entry control area boundary, or for uncontrolled VFR flights below CTA, the letters VFR.
  3. INSERT: Route of flight described in terms of the following significant points
    1. Last domestic reporting point prior to ocean entry.
    2. Oceanic control area boundary entry point.
    3. Significant points formed as stated below.
    4. Oceanic control area boundary exit point.
    5. First domestic reporting point after ocean exit.
Note - Each point at which a change in speed or level is requested must be specified and followed, in each case by the next route segment expressed as geographical coordinates in latitude and longitude.
Data convention for the various conventions in item 15
USE ONLY: the conventions in (1) to (5) below and SEPARATE each sub-item by a SPACE.
  1. ATS ROUTE (2 to 7 characters). The coded designator assigned to the route or route segment (e.g. G3, G11, UB10, KODAP2A).
  2. SIGNIFICANT POINT (2 to 11 characters).The coded designator (2 to 5 characters) assigned to the point (e.g. MY, ING, LARUX), or if no coded designator has been assigned, one of the following ways: Degrees only (7 characters) 2 figures describing latitude in degrees, followed by "N" (North) or "S" (South), followed by 3 figures describing longitude in degrees, followed by "E" (East) or "W" (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros, e.g. 46N078W. Degrees and minutes (11 characters) 4 figures describing latitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes followed by "N" (North) or "S" (South), followed by 5 figures describing longitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes, followed by "E" (East) or "W" (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros, e.g. 4620N07805W. INSERT: DCT between successive points unless both points are defined by geographical coordinates. Note Points defined by a bearing and distance from a significant point are not allowed in the Reykjavik FIR/CTA due to the discrepancy that can exist between the actual positions derived from such points by aircraft and flight data processing systems.
  3. CHANGE OF SPEED OR LEVEL (maximum 21 characters). The point at which a change of speed (5% TAS or 0.01 Mach or more) or change of level is planned, expressed exactly as in (2) above, followed by an oblique stroke and both the cruising speed and the cruising level, WITHOUT A SPACE between them, even when only one of those quantities will be changed. Examples: LN/N0284A045 MAY/N0305F180 HADDY/N0420F330 4602N07805W/M082F350 DUB180040/N0350M084
  4. CHANGE OF FLIGHT RULES (maximum 3 characters). The point at which the change of flight rules is planned, expressed exactly as in (2) or (3) above as appropriate, FOLLOWED BY A SPACE and one of the following: VFR if from IFR to VFR, IFR if from VFR to IFR. Examples: LN VFR, LN/N0284A050 IFR
  5. CRUISE CLIMB (maximum 28 characters) The letter C followed by an oblique stroke then the point at which cruise climb is planned to start, expressed exactly as in (2) above, followed by an oblique stroke, then the speed to be maintained during cruise climb, followed by the two levels defining the layer to be occupied during cruise climb, or the level at which cruise climb is planned followed by the letters PLUS, WITHOUT A SPACE between them. Examples: C/48N050W/M082F290F350, C/48N050W/M082F290PLUS, C/52N050W/M220F580F620.
Requirements for Flight Plans on random route segments
Flights conducted wholly or partly outside the organized tracks shall be planned along great circle tracks joining successive significant points and flight plans shall be made in accordance with the following:
  1. Flights operating between North America and Europe shall generally be considered as operating in a predominantly east-west direction. However, flights planned between these two continents via the North Pole shall be considered as operating in predominantly north-south direction.
  2. For flights conducted along one of the organized tracks from the entry point into the NAT flight information regions to the exit point, the organized track shall be defined in the flight plan by the abbreviation "NAT" followed by the code letter assigned to the track.
Requirements for Flight Plans entering the Reykjavik CTA from the Edmonton CTA
Flight plans shall contain entry points as follows:
  1. at or north of 82N, a boundary position at 060W
  2. south of 82N, one of the following waypoints: APSIN, BUDUM, DEXUN, ELNUS, PAMLA, SINVU, DOGGY, LENIM, GELBO, DAPAK, MEDPA, INGUM, NADMA, ADSAM, BOPUT, CANEL, DARUB, EPMAN
  3. Flights entering Gander Oceanic and then proceeding either through Montreal airspace and Edmonton airspace, or directly into Edmonton before entering Reykjavik Oceanic shall file as follows:
    1. Aircraft routing over 65N, at or east of 060W, shall file a waypoint at 65N;
    2. Aircraft routing over 65N, west of 060W, shall file via named waypoint by the boundary between Edmonton and Reykjavik.
Requirements for Flight Plans on random route segments at or south of 70N
For flights operating at or south of 70N, the planned tracks shall normally be defined by significant points formed by the intersection of half or whole degrees of latitude with meridians spaced at intervals of 10° from the Greenwich meridian to longitude 70W.
The distance between significant points shall, as far as possible, not exceed one hour's flight time.
Additional significant points should be established when deemed necessary due to aircraft speed or the angle at which the meridians are crossed, e.g. at intervals of 10° of longitude (between 5W and 65W).
  1. Aircraft operating across the boundary between Reykjavik (BIRD) and Scottish (EGPX) shall file through one of the named points BARKU, DEVBI, BESGA, NALAN, OSBON, PEMOS, RIXUN or SOSAR as appropriate.
  2. Flights routing between RATSU and GUNPA in either direction shall operate direct (DCT) between those points.
  3. Eastbound flights routing across the boundary between BIRD and Stavanger (ENSV) shall file their route via one of the following waypoints: GUNPA, VALDI, ERSER, IPTON, BARUD or ISVIG.
Requirements for Flight Plans departing/arriving at Keflavik or Reykjavik.
Flights with Keflavík or Reykjavík as Departure point or Destination are not required to file their route via waypoints at 010W, if routing north of RATSU (61N010W).
  1. Eastbound departures:
    1. Flights departing Reykjavik shall file their route via:
      1. LUTER MOXAL if crossing 010W between 64N and RATSU inclusive;
      2. PIXUM PETUX PODAR if crossing 010W between ATSIX and GOMUP inclusive;
      3. RIMUM RUMUX RAPAX if crossing 61N west of 01630W.
    2. Flights departing Keflavik shall file their route via:
      1. LUTER if crossing 010W atbetween 64N and 66N;
      2. OSKUM if crossing 010W between 63N and RATSU inclusive;
      3. PIXUM PETUX PODAR if crossing 010W between ATSIX and GOMUP inclusive
      4. RIMUM RUMUX RAPAX if crossing 61N west of 01630W.
      5. Flight planning for eastbound departures with ETD between 0600 and 0900 and entering SHANWICK OCA shall be filed via:
        1. PIXUM PETUX PODAR ORTAV ODPEX or;
        2. RIMUM RUMUX RAPAX and then via ERAKA ETSOM or more southerly route.
    3. Flights departing Keflavik shall not file their route via 6330Nbetween 63N and 64N at 10W.
  2. Westbound departures, for flights crossing 030W at:
    1. 66N shall file their route via SORIR SUKED
    2. 65N shall file their route via SORIR SOPEN (F290 and above only)
    3. SOSIT (F280 and below only) shall file their route via SORIR
    4. 64N shall file their route via RALOV ROTIN
    5. 63N shall file their route via RALOV RAKIS
    6. 62N or 61N shall file their route via DELES DOPOD
  3. Westbound arrivals:
    1. Flights crossing 010W between 64N and ATSIX inclusive shall file their route via:
      1. ING G3 NASBU KFV/EL, or
      2. ALDAN ASRUN KFV/EL.
    2. Flights entering BIRD between 61N 01236W and 61N019W shall file their route via BREKI BASLU KFV/EL.
  4. Eastbound arrivals, for flights crossing 030W at:
    1. 66N shall file their route via INDES INGAN
    2. NONRO (F280 and below only) shall file their route via INGAN
    3. 65N shall file their route via GOKIK GIRUG (F290 and above only)
    4. 64N shall file their route via GISTU GIRUG
    5. 63N shall file their route via EPENI ELDIS
    6. 62N shall file their route via ELREX ELDIS
    7. 61N shall file their route via BAXER BIRNA
Requirements for Flight Plans on random route segments north of 70, and at or south of 80 degrees North
The planned tracks shall normally be defined by significant points formed by the intersection of parallels of latitude expressed in degrees and minutes with meridians normally spaced at intervals of 20° from the Greenwich meridian to longitude 60W, using the longitudes 000W, 020W, 040W and 060W.
The distance between significant points shall, as far as possible, not exceed one hour's flight time. Additional significant points should be established when deemed necessary due to aircraft speed or the angle at which the meridians are crossed, e.g. at intervals of 20° of longitude (between 10W and 50W).
However, when the flight time between successive significant points is less than 30 minutes, one of these points may be omitted.
For flights whose flight paths at or south of 80N are predominantly oriented in a north-south direction, the planned tracks shall normally be defined by significant points formed by the intersection of whole degree of longitude with specified parallels of latitude which are spaced at 5°.
Requirements for Flight Plans on random route segments north of 80 degrees North
The planned tracks shall be defined by points of intersection of parallels of latitude expressed in degrees and minutes with meridians expressed in whole degrees. The distance between significant points shall, normally equate to not less than 30 and not more than 60 minutes of flying time
Requirements for Flight Plans on OTS
INSERT: If (and only if) the flight is planned to operate along the whole length of one of the organized tracks as detailed in the NAT track message, the abbreviation "NAT" followed by the code letter assigned to the track. Flights wishing to join or leave an organized track at some intermediate point are considered random route aircraft and full track details must be specified in the flight plan. The track letter should not be used to abbreviate any portion of the route in these circumstances.
Note 1 - Each point at which either a change in speed or level is requested must be specified as geographical coordinates in latitude and longitude followed, in each case, by the abbreviation "NAT" and the code letter assigned to the track.
Note 2 - Flight planning to operate wholly or partly outside the NAT Organized Track System (OTS) should flight plan cruising level(s) appropriate to direction of flight except that, within the Gander / Shanwick OACs and Reykjavik CTA, during the westbound OTS (valid from 1130Z to 1900Z at 30 West) westbound aircraft may flight plan level 330 and during the eastbound OTS (valid from 0100Z to 0800Z at 30 West) eastbound aircraft may plan flight level 350.
Requirements for Flights along designated ATS routes
INSERT: if the departure aerodrome is located on, or connected to the ATS route, the designator of the first ATS route,
or
if the departure aerodrome is not on, or connected to the ATS route, the letters DCT followed by the point of joining the first ATS route, followed by the designator of the ATS route.
THEN
INSERT: each point at which either a change of speed or level, a change of ATS route, and/or a change of flight rules is planned.
Note - When a transition is planned between a lower and upper ATS route and the routes are oriented in the same direction, the point of transition need not be inserted.
FOLLOWED IN EACH CASE
by the designator of the next ATS route segment, even if the same as the previous one,
or
by DCT, if the flight to the next point will be outside a designated route, unless both points are defined by geographical coordinates.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.8
ITEM 16: DESTINATION AERODROME AND TOTAL ESTIMATED ELAPSED TIME, DESTINATION ALTERNATE AERODROME(S)
DESTINATION AERODROME AND TOTAL ESTIMATED ELAPSED TIME (8 characters).
INSERT: the ICAO four-letter location indicator of the aerodrome of destination as specified in Doc 7910, Location Indicators,
OR
if no location indicator has been assigned,
INSERT: ZZZZ and SPECIFY in Item 18 the name and location of the aerodrome preceded by DEST/.
THEN WITHOUT A SPACE
INSERT the total estimated elapsed time.
Note 1 - Total estimated elapsed time. For IFR flights, the estimated time required from take-off to arrive over that designated point, defined by reference to navigation aids, from which it is intended that an instrument approach procedure will be commenced, or, if no navigation aid is associated with the destination aerodrome, to arrive over the destination aerodrome. For VFR flights, the estimated time required from take-off to arrive over the destination aerodrome.
Note 2 - For flight plan received from an aircraft in flight, the total estimated elapsed time is the estimated time from the first point of the route to which the flight plan applies to the termination point of the flight plan.
DESTINATION ALTERNATE AERODROME(S) (4 characters).
INSERT: the ICAO four-letter location indicator(s) of not more than two destination alternate aerodromes, as specified in Doc 7910, Location Indicators, SEPARATED BY A SPACE,
OR
if no location indicator has been assigned to the destination alternate aerodrome(s),
INSERT: ZZZZ and SPECIFY in Item 18 the name and location of the destination alternate aerodrome(s), preceded by ALTN/.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.9
ITEM 18: OTHER INFORMATION
Note - Use of indicators not included under this item may result in data being rejected, processed incorrectly or lost.
Hyphens or oblique strokes should only be used as prescribed below.
INSERT 0 (zero) if no other information,
OR any other necessary information in the sequence shown hereunder, in the form of the appropriate indicator selected from those defined hereunder followed by an oblique stroke and the information to be recorded:
STS/ Reason for special handling by ATS, e.g. a search and rescue mission, as follows:
ALTRV: for a flight operated in accordance with an altitude reservation;ATFMX: for a flight approved for exemption from ATFM measures by the appropriate ATS authority;FFR: fire-fighting;FLTCK: flight check for calibration of navaids;HAZMAT: for a flight carrying hazardous material;HEAD: a flight with Head of State status;HOSP: for a medical flight declared by medical authorities;HUM: for a flight operating on a humanitarian mission;MARSA: for a flight for which a military entity assumes responsibility for separation of military aircraft;MEDEVAC: for a life critical medical emergency evacuation;NONRVSM: for a non-RVSM capable flight intending to operate in RVSM airspace;SAR: for a flight engaged in a search and rescue mission; andSTATE: for a flight engaged in military, customs or police services.
Other reasons for special handling by ATS shall be denoted under the designator RMK/.
PBN/ Indication of RNAV and/or RNP capabilities. Include as many of the descriptors below, as apply to the flight, up to a maximum of 8 entries, i.e. a total of not more than 16 characters.
RNAV SPECIFICATIONS
A1 RNAV 10 (RNP 10)
All RNAV 10 (RNP 10) approved aircraft intending to operate in the NAT Region shall insert the A1 descriptor, following the PBN/ indicator.
B1 RNAV 5 all permitted sensors
B2 RNAV 5 GNSS
B3 RNAV 5 DME/DME
B4 RNAV 5 VOR/DME
B5 RNAV 5 INS or IRS
B6 RNAV 5 LORANC
C1 RNAV 2 all permitted sensors
C2 RNAV 2 GNSS
C3 RNAV 2 DME/DME
C4 RNAV 2 DME/DME/IRU
D1 RNAV 1 all permitted sensors
D2 RNAV 1 GNSS
D3 RNAV 1 DME/DME
D4 RNAV 1 DME/DME/IRU
RNP SPECIFICATIONS
L1 RNP 4
All RNP 4 approved aircraft intending to operate in the NAT Region shall insert the L1 descriptor
O1 Basic RNP 1 all permitted sensors
O2 Basic RNP 1 GNSS
O3 Basic RNP 1 DME/DME
O4 Basic RNP 1 DME/DME/IRU
S1 RNP APCH
S2 RNP APCH with BARO-VNAV
All RNP APCH approved aircraft flying into BIKF shall insert the S1 or S2 descriptor
T1 RNP AR APCH with RF (special authorization required)
T2 RNP AR APCH without RF (special authorization required)
Combinations of alphanumeric characters not indicated above are reserved.
NAV/ Significant data related to navigation equipment, other than specified in PBN/, as required by the appropriate ATS authority. Indicate GNSS augmentation under this indicator, with a space between two or more methods of augmentation, e.g. NAV/GBAS SBAS.
COM/ Indicate communications equipment or capabilities not specified in Item 10a.
DAT/ Indicate data equipment or capabilities not specified in 10a.
SUR/ Include surveillance equipment or capabilities not specified in Item 10b.
Indicate as many RSP specification(s) as apply to the flight, using designator(s) with no space. Multiple RSP specifications are separated by a space. Example: RSP180 RSP400.
DEP/ Name and location of departure aerodrome, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 13, or the ATS unit from which supplementary flight plan data can be obtained, if AFIL is inserted in Item 13. For aerodromes not listed in the relevant Aeronautical Information Publication, indicate location as follows:,
With 4 figures describing latitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes followed by "N" (North) or "S" (South), followed by 5 figures describing longitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes, followed by "E" (East) or "W" (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros, e.g. 4620N07805W (11 characters).
OR, The first point of the route (name or LAT/LONG) or the marker radio beacon, if the aircraft has not taken off from an aerodrome.
DEST/ Name and location of destination aerodrome, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 16. For aerodromes not listed in the relevant Aeronautical Information Publication, indicate location in LAT/LONG.
DOF/ The date of flight departure in a six figure format (YYMMDD, where YY equals the year, MM equals the month and DD equals the day).
REG/ The nationality or common mark and registration mark of the aircraft, if different from the aircraft identification in Item 7. All aircraft intending to operate in the NAT Region shall insert in Item 18 of the flight plan the aircraft registration (following the REG/ indicator) and the aircraft address encoded as six hexadecimal characters (following the CODE/ designator).
EET/ The accumulated estimated elapsed time to each oceanic FIR boundary shall be specified in Item 18 of the flight plan.
Examples: EET/EINN0204
SEL/ SELCAL Code, for aircraft so equipped.
TYP/ Type(s) of aircraft, preceded if necessary without a space by number(s) of aircraft and separated by one space, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 9.
Example: TYP/2F15 5F5 3B2
CODE/ Aircraft address (expressed in the form of an alphanumerical code of six hexadecimal characters). Example: "F00001" is the lowest aircraft address contained in the specific block administered by ICAO.
DLE/ Enroute delay or holding, insert the significant point(s) on the route where a delay is planned to occur, followed by the length of delay using four figure time in hours and minutes (hhmm).
Example: DLE/MDG0030
OPR/ ICAO designator or name of the aircraft operating agency, if different from the aircraft identification in item 7
ORGN/ The originator's 8 letter AFTN address or other appropriate contact details, in cases where the originator of the flight plan may not be readily identified, as required by the appropriate ATS authority.
Note - In some areas, flight plan reception centres may insert the ORGN/ identifier and originator's AFTN address automatically.
PER/ Aircraft performance data, indicated by a single letter as specified in the Procedures for Air Navigation Services - Aircraft Operations (PANS-OPS, Doc 8168), Volume I - Flight Procedures, if so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority.
ALTN/ Name of destination alternate aerodrome(s), if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 16. For aerodromes not listed in the relevant Aeronautical Information Publication, indicate location in LAT/LONG.
RALT/ ICAO four letter indicator(s) for en-route alternate(s), as specified in Doc 7910, Location Indicators, or name(s) of en-route alternate aerodrome(s), if no indicator is allocated. For aerodromes not listed in the relevant Aeronautical Information Publication, indicate location in LAT/LONG.
TALT/ ICAO four letter indicator(s) for take-off alternate, as specified in Doc 7910, Location Indicators, or name of take-off alternate aerodrome, if no indicator is allocated. For aerodromes not listed in the relevant Aeronautical Information Publication, indicate location in LAT/LONG.
RIF/ The route details to the revised destination aerodrome, following by the ICAO four-letter location indicator of the aerodrome. The revised route is subject to reclearance in flight.
Examples:
RIF/DTA HEC KLAX
RIF/ESP G94 CLA YPPH
RMK/ Any other plain language remarks when required by the appropriate ATS authority or deemed necessary.
ENR 1.8.4.1.3.10
ITEM 19: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
Note - This information is NOT normally included in transmission of flight plan message. It is retained, however, at location of filing of flight plan.
ENDURANCE.
After E/ INSERT a 4-figure group giving the fuel endurance in hours and minutes.
PERSONS ON BOARD.
After P/ INSERT the total number of persons (passengers and crew) on board, when required by the appropriate ATS authority. INSERT TBN (to be notified) if the total number of persons is not known at the time of filing.
EMERGENCY AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT
R/ (RADIO).
CROSS OUT U if UHF on frequency 243.0 MHz is not available.
CROSS OUT V if VHF on frequency 121.5 MHz is not available.
CROSS OUT E if emergency location transmitter (ELT) is not available.
S/ (SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT).
CROSS OUT all indicators if survival equipment is not carried.
CROSS OUT P if polar survival equipment is not carried.
CROSS OUT D if desert survival equipment is not carried.
CROSS OUT M if maritime survival equipment is not carried.
CROSS OUT J if jungle survival equipment is not carried.
J/ (JACKETS).
CROSS OUT all indicators if life jackets are not carried.
CROSS OUT L if life jackets are not equipped with lights.
CROSS OUT F if life jackets are not equipped with fluorescein.
CROSS OUT U or V or both as in R/ above to indicate radio capability of jackets, if any.
D/ (DINGHIES).
(NUMBER) - CROSS OUT indicators D and C if no dinghies are carried, or INSERT number of dinghies carried, and
(CAPACITY) INSERT total capacity, in persons, of all dinghies carried, and
(COVER) CROSS OUT indicator C if dinghies are not covered; and
(COLOUR) - INSERT colour of dinghies if carried.
A/ (AIRCRAFT COLOUR AND MARKINGS).
INSERT colour of aircraft and significant markings.
N/ (REMARKS).
CROSS OUT indicator N if no remarks, or INDICATE any other survival equipment carried and any other remarks regarding survival equipment.
C/ (PILOT).
INSERT name of pilot-in-command.

ENR 1.8.5 Air-Ground Communications and in-Flight Reporting

An aircraft operated as a controlled flight, or an IFR flight operating outside controlled airspace, shall maintain continuous air-ground voice communication watch on the appropriate communication channel of, and establish two-way communication as necessary with, the appropriate air traffic control unit.
Note 1 - SELCAL or similar automatic signaling devices satisfy the requirement to maintain an air-ground voice communication watch.
Note 2 - The requirement for an aircraft to maintain an air-ground voice communication watch remains in effect after CPDLC has been established.
Note - Additional information on Air-Ground Communication and in-Flight Reporting is contained in GEN 3.4.
Note - Information on frequencies can be found in section ENR 2.1.
ENR 1.8.5.1 Time or place of position reports
A controlled flight shall report to the appropriate air traffic services unit, as soon as possible, the time and level of passing each designated compulsory reporting point, together with any other required information. Position reports shall similarly be made in relation to additional points when requested by the appropriate air traffic services unit. In the absence of designated reporting points, position reports shall be made at intervals prescribed in 1.8.5.1.1. Controlled flights providing position information to the appropriate air traffic services unit via data link communications shall only provide voice position reports when requested.
Note - The conditions and circumstances in which ADS-B or SSR Mode C transmission of pressure-altitude satisfies the requirement for level information in position reports are indicated in the PANS-ATM (Doc 4444).
ENR 1.8.5.1.1 Designated reporting points
Unless otherwise required by air traffic services, position reports for flights on routes not defined by designated reporting points shall be made at the significant points listed in the flight plan.
  1. Air traffic services may require any flight operating predominantly in an east-west direction to report its position at any of the intermediate meridians spaced at intervals of:
    1. 10° of longitude south of 70N (between 5W and 65W), and
    2. 20° of longitude north of 70N (between 10W and 50W).
  2. Air traffic services may require any flight operating generally in north-south direction to report its position at any intermediate parallel at latitude when deemed necessary.
  3. In requiring aircraft to report their position at intermediate intervals, the air traffic services authorities will be guided by the requirement to have position information at approximately hourly intervals and also by the need to cater for varying types of aircraft and for varying traffic and meteorological conditions.
ENR 1.8.5.1.2 Accuracy
Position information shall be based on the best obtainable navigation fix. The time of fixing aircraft position shall be arranged so as to provide the most accurate position information and estimates possible.
ENR 1.8.5.2 Contents of position reports
(P-ATM, 4.11 and 4.12)
ENR 1.8.5.2.1 Position and time
  1. Verbal positions reports shall be identified by the spoken word "Position" transmitted immediately before or after the aircraft identification.
  2. Except as provided in 3. below, position shall for flights outside the ATS route network, be expressed in terms of latitude and longitude. For flights whose tracks are predominantly east or west, latitude shall be expressed in degrees and minutes, longitude in degrees only. For flights whose tracks are predominantly north or south, latitude shall be expressed in degrees only, longitude in degrees and minutes.
  3. Aircraft operating in an organized track system for supersonic aircraft operations may report their positions by reference to the track code with the longitude of the reporting point.
  4. When making position reports all times should be expressed in four digits, giving both the hour and minutes
ENR 1.8.5.2.2 Next position and time over
  1. “Next position” shall normally be expressed as the significant point at which the aircraft is next required to report its position.
  2. The name or location of the ensuing significant point following the "next position and estimated time" shall be given when making position reports within oceanic control areas.
  3. If the estimated time for the next position last reported to air traffic control is found to be in error by three minutes or more, a revised estimate shall be transmitted to the ATS unit concerned as soon as possible.
ENR 1.8.5.2.3 Level
Aircraft cleared for cruise climb shall report their level to the nearest 100 feet (30 m).
Note 1 - Levels so reported, e.g. 354, may not necessarily be flight levels as defined in the PANS-OPS, Part III.
ENR 1.8.5.2.4 Abbreviated reports
  1. When operating in an organized track system for supersonic aircraft operations, position reports may be abbreviated as notified by the appropriate ATS authority concerned.
  2. Abbreviated position reports for supersonic aircraft shall consist of aircraft identification, position and time.
ENR 1.8.5.3 Transmission of position reports
(P-ATM, 4-11)
Position reports made by aircraft operating within an oceanic control area at a distance of 60 NM (110 km) or less from the common boundary with an adjacent oceanic control area, including aircraft operating on tracks through successive points on such boundary, shall also be made to the area control centre serving the adjacent control area.
Responsibility for the transmission of position reports to the additional ATS units specified in 1.8.5.3.1 may be delegated to the appropriate communication station(s) through local agreement.
ENR 1.8.5.4 Meteorological reports
When voice communications are used, oceanic area control centres shall designate, from among the aircraft intending to operate on the organized tracks, those which shall be required to report routine meteorological observations at each prescribed reporting point. This designation shall be made by the oceanic area control centre delivering the oceanic clearance, using the phrase “SEND MET REPORTS”, and should normally be made so as to designate one aircraft per track at approximately hourly intervals.
Note - When air-ground data link is being used for meteorological reporting during flight, no aircraft observations by voice communications are required, in accordance with Annex 3, 5.3.1.

ENR 1.8.6 Radio Communication Failure in NAT Region

(Doc7030 NAT 3.5.2.3; Doc7030 NAT 6.1.2.2)
Note Due to their sensitivity to atmospheric conditions, HF communications are inherently less reliable than VHF. Adverse propagation conditions may completely preclude communications in specific volumes of airspace, especially at high latitudes during periods of high sunspot activity. Such a failure of HF communications is likely to impact all aircraft in the affected area, that assumption is indeed factored into the application of air traffic services. It is therefore imperative under such HF-blackout circumstances that all aircraft continue to adhere to their clearances and do NOT invoke radio communications failure (RCF) procedures that stipulate divergence from the cleared flight level.
ENR 1.8.6.1 General
The following procedures are intended to provide general guidance for aircraft operating into or from the NAT Region experiencing a communications failure. These procedures are intended to complement and not supersede State procedures/regulations. It is not possible to provide guidance for all situations associated with communications failure.
The pilot shall attempt to contact either another aircraft or any ATC facility and inform it of the difficulty and request that information be relayed to the ATC facility with whom communications are intended.
ENR 1.8.6.2 Communications failure prior to entering NAT Region
If operating with a received and acknowledged oceanic clearance, the pilot shall enter oceanic airspace at the cleared oceanic entry point, level and speed and proceed in accordance with the received and acknowledged oceanic clearance. Any level or speed changes required to comply with the oceanic clearance shall be completed within the vicinity of the oceanic entry point.
If operating without a received and acknowledged oceanic clearance, the pilot shall enter oceanic airspace at the first oceanic entry point, level and speed, as contained in the filed flight plan and proceed via the filed flight plan route to landfall. That first oceanic level and speed shall be maintained to landfall.
ENR 1.8.6.3 Communications failure prior to exiting NAT Region
ENR 1.8.6.3.1 Cleared on filed flight plan route
The pilot shall proceed in accordance with the last received and acknowledged oceanic clearance, including level and speed, to the last specified oceanic route point, normally landfall, then continue on the filed flight plan route. The pilot shall maintain the last assigned oceanic level and speed to landfall and, after passing the last specified oceanic route point, the pilot shall conform with the relevant State procedures/regulations.
ENR 1.8.6.3.2 Cleared on other than filed flight plan route
The pilot shall proceed in accordance with the last received and acknowledged oceanic clearance, including level and speed, to the last specified oceanic route point, normally landfall. After passing this point, the pilot shall conform with the relevant State procedures/regulations and rejoin the filed flight plan route by proceeding, via the published ATS route structure where possible, to the next significant point ahead as contained in the filed flight plan.
Note 1 - The relevant State procedures/regulations to be followed by aircraft in order to rejoin its filed flight plan route are specified in detail in the appropriate National Aeronautical Information Publication.
ENR 1.8.6.4 The use of satellite communications (SATCOM)
When operating in BIRD and BGGL FIRs, aircrew unable to make position reports via VHF or CPDLC, ADS-C or FMC are expected to use HF or SATCOM telephone if so equipped. SATCOM voice communications should be made to Iceland radio, short code is 425105. The numbers 425101 and 425103, are connected at Reykjavik ATC centre and are valid for aircrew encountering emergencies.

ENR 1.8.7 Special Procedures for In - Flight Contingencies

ENR 1.8.7.1 General
The following procedures are intended for guidance only. Although all possible contingencies cannot be covered, they provide for the more frequent cases, such as:
  1. inability to maintain assigned level;
  2. en-route diversion across the prevailing NAT traffic flow; and
  3. loss of, or significant reduction, in required navigation capability.
With regard to 1. and 2. above, the procedures are applicable primarily when rapid descent and/or turnback or diversion is required. The pilot's judgment shall determine the sequence of actions taken, having regard to the prevailing circumstances.
ENR 1.8.7.2 General procedures
The following general procedures apply;
If an aircraft is unable to continue flight in accordance with its air traffic control clearance, a revised clearance shall be obtained, whenever possible, prior to initiating any action.
The radiotelephony distress signal (MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY) or urgency signal (PAN PAN, PAN PAN, PAN PAN) shall be used as appropriate.
If these contingency procedures are employed, the pilot shall advise air traffic control as soon as practicable, reminding them of the type of aircraft involved and the nature of the problem.
If prior clearance cannot be obtained, the pilot shall:
  1. broadcast position (including the ATS route designator or the track code, as appropriate) and intentions at frequent intervals on frequency 121.5 MHz, with 123.45 MHz as a backup frequency. If, however, the aircraft is in an area where ATC communications are being conducted on VHF, pending receipt of any reclearance, the position and intentions should be broadcast on the current control frequency, rather than 123.45 MHz;
  2. turn on external lights; and
  3. maintain a watch (utilizing airborne collision avoidance system (ACAS) if available) for conflicting traffic.
Aircraft should be flown at a flight level and/or on offset track where other aircraft are least likely to be encountered.
ENR 1.8.7.3 The following guidance is recommended for aircraft operating within NAT airspace.
ENR 1.8.7.3.1 Initial action
If unable to obtain prior air traffic control clearance, the aircraft should leave its assigned route or track by initially turning 45 degrees to the right or left to acquire on offset track of 15 NM (28 km). The direction of the turn should, where possible, be determined by the position of the aircraft relative to any organized route or track system (e.g. whether the aircraft is outside, at the edge of, or within the organized track system (OTS)). Other factors which may affect the direction of the turn are the location of an alternate airport, terrain clearance, levels allocated on adjacent routes or tracks and any known SLOP offsets adopted by other nearby traffic.
ENR 1.8.7.3.2 Subsequent action (using offset procedures)
  1. An aircraft that is able to maintain its assigned flight level, once the aircraft has deviated 10 nm (19 km) from the assigned track centerline, climb or descend to select a flight level which differs from those normally used by 150 m (500 ft), if at or below FL 410, or by 300 m (1 000 ft) if above FL 410.
  2. An aircraft that is unable to maintain its assigned flight level should:
    1. initially minimize its descent rate to the extent possible;
    2. take account of other aircraft possibly being laterally offset from its track;
    3. select a flight level which differs from those normally used by 150 m (500 ft) if at or below FL410, or by 300 m (1000 ft) if above F410;
    4. if it is random track aircraft operating in HLA and its distance is less than 60 NM (110 km) from any organized track, establish and maintain a 10NM (19 km) offset track from any OTS track prior to initiating descent if the aircraft is able to do so; and
    5. contact ATC as soon as practicable and request a revised ATC clearance.
  3. An aircraft that is not HLA MNPS/RVSM approved and is unable to maintain a flight level above HLA should descend to a flight level below HLA.
  4. An aircraft compelled to make a descent through HLA, whether continuing to destination or turning back, should if its descent will conflict with an organized track:
    1. plan to descend to a level below FL 280;
    2. prior to passing FL 410, proceed to a point midway between a convenient pair of organized tracks prior to entering that track system from above;
    3. while descending between FL 410 and FL 280, maintain a track that is midway between and parallel with the organized tracks; and
    4. contact ATC as soon as practicable and request a revised ATC clearance.
ENR 1.8.7.3.3 En-route diversion across the prevailing NAT air traffic flow
Before diverting across the flow of adjacent traffic, the aircraft should climb above FL 410 or descend below Fl 280 using the procedures specified in 1.8.7.3.2. However, if the pilot is unable or unwilling to do so, the aircraft should be flown at a level as defined in 1.8.7.3.2.1. for the diversion until a revised ATC clearance is obtained.
ENR 1.8.7.4 Weather deviation procedures for oceanic-controlled airspace (NAT Doc007 13.4)
ENR 1.8.7.4.1 General
  1. The following procedures are intended to provide guidance for deviations around thunderstorms. All possible circumstances cannot be covered. The pilot´s judgement shall ultimately determine the sequence of actions taken. ATC shall render all possible assistance.
  2. If the aircraft is required to deviate from track to avoid weather and prior clearance cannot be obtained, an ATC clearance shall be obtained at the earliest possible time. Until an ATC clearance is received, the aircraft shall follow the procedures detailed in 1.8.7.4.4.
  3. The pilot shall inform ATC when weather deviation is no longer required, or when a weather deviation has been completed and the aircraft has returned to the centre line of its cleared route.
ENR 1.8.7.4.2 Obtaining priority from ATC when weather deviation is required
  1. When the pilot initiates communications with ATC, rapid response may be obtained by stating “WEATHER DEVIATION REQUIRED” to indicate that priority is desired on the frequency and for ATC response.
  2. The pilot still retains the options of initiating the communications using the urgency call “PAN PAN” (preferably spoken three times) to alert all listening parties to a special handling condition which will receive ATC priority for issuance of a clearance or assistance.
ENR 1.8.7.4.3 Actions to be taken when controller-pilot communications are established
  1. The pilot notifies ATC and requests clearance to deviate from track, advising, when possible, the extent of the deviation expected.
  2. ATC takes one of the following actions:
    1. if there is no conflicting traffic in the horizontal plane ATC will issue clearance to deviate from track; or
    2. if there is conflicting traffic in the horizontal plane ATC separates aircraft by establishing appropriate separation; or
    3. if there is conflicting traffic in the horizontal plane and ATC is unable to establish appropriate separation, ATC shall:
      1. advise the pilot of inablility to issue clearance for requested deviation;
      2. advise the pilot of conflicting traffic; and
      3. request the pilot´s intentions.
        SAMPLE PHRASEOLOGY
        “UNABLE (requested deviation),
        TRAFFIC IS (call sign, position, altitude, direction),
        ADVISE INTENTIONS.”
  3. The pilot will take the following actions:
    1. advise ATC of intentions; and
      1. comply with the ATC clearance issued; or
      2. execute the procedures detailed in 1.8.7.4.4; and
    2. if necessary, establish voice communications with ATC to expedite dialogue on the situation.
ENR 1.8.7.4.4 Actions to be taken if a revised ATC clearance cannot be obtained
  1. The provisions of this section apply to situations where a pilot has the need to exercise the authority of a pilot-in-command under the provisions of Annex 2, 2.3.1.
  2. If a revised ATC clearance cannot be obtained and deviation from track is required to avoid weather, the pilot shall take the following actions:
    1. if possible, deviate away from the organized track or route system;
    2. establish communications with and alert nearby aircraft by broadcasting, at suitable intervals: aircraft identification, flight level, aircraft position (including ATS route designator or the track code) and intentions, on the frequency in use and on frequency 121.5 MHz (or, as a back-up, on the VHF inter-pilot air -to-air frequency 123.45 MHz;
    3. watch for conflicting traffic both visually and by reference to ACAS (if equipped); Note - If, as a result of actions taken under the provisions of 1.8.7.4.4. 2 b. and c., the pilot determines that there is another aircraft at or near the same flight level with which a conflict may occur, then the pilot is expected to adjust the path of the aircraft, as necessary, to avoid conflict.
    4. turn on all aircraft exterior lights (commensurate with appropriate operating limitations);
    5. for deviations of less than 10 NM (19 km), aircraft should remain at a level assigned by ATC;
    6. for deviations of greater than 10 NM (19 km), when the aircraft is approximately 10 NM (19 km) from track, initiate a level change based on the following criteria: *
    7. when returning to track, be at its assigned flight level, when the aircraft is within approximately 10 NM (19 km) of centre line; and
    8. if contact was not established prior to deviating, continue to attempt to contact ATC to obtain a clearance. If contact was established, continue to keep ATC advised of intentions and obtain essential traffic information.
*Route centre line trackDeviations > 10 NM (19 km)Level change
EAST 000° - 179° magneticLEFTDESCEND 90 m (300 ft)
RIGHTCLIMB 90 m (300 ft)
WEST 180° - 359° magneticLEFTCLIMB 90 m (300 ft)
RIGHTDESCEND 90 m (300 ft)

ENR 1.8.8 Air Traffic Control Clearances

ENR 1.8.8.1 Contents of clearances (A11 - 3.7; P-ATM, 4.5.4,4.5.7 AND 11.4.2.5.2)
An abbreviated clearance shall only be issued by ATS when clearing an aircraft to follow one of the organized tracks throughout its flight within the NAT control areas, or when clearing an aircraft to follow its flight plan route. In all other circumstances, full details of the cleared track shall be specified in the clearance message.
  1. When an abbreviated clearance is issued to follow one of the organized tracks it shall include:
    1. cleared track specified by the track code;
    2. cleared flight level(s);
    3. cleared Mach Number (if required);
    4. if the aircraft is designated to report meteorological information in flight, the phrase “SEND MET REPORTS”.
  2. On receipt of an abbreviated clearance the pilot shall read back the contents of the clearance message. In addition, when cleared to follow one of the organized tracks, the pilot shall read back full details of the track specified by the code letter, except where alternative procedures using VHF techniques exist which include provision for the confirmation of cleared track by the pilot.
When an abbreviated clearance is issued to follow the flight plan route, it shall only be issued using direct controller/pilot communication, and shall include:
  1. the expression “cleared via flight planned route“;
  2. cleared flight level(s);
  3. cleared Mach Number (if required).
On receipt of an abbreviated clearance, the pilot shall read back the contents of the clearance message. In addition, when cleared via "flight planned route", the pilot shall read back full details of the flight plan route.
A pilot-in-command shall, if at any time in doubt, request a detailed description of the route from ATS.
The ATC-approved Mach number shall be included in each clearance given to subsonic turbo-jet aircraft operating within Bodö Oceanic, Gander Oceanic New York Oceanic, Reykjavik, Santa Maria Oceanic and Shanwick Oceanic areas.
ENR 1.8.8.2 Adherence to ATC approved route
(A2 - 3.6.2)
If an aircraft has inadvertently deviated from the route specified in its ATC clearance it shall forthwith take action to regain such route within 100 NM (185 km) from the position at which the deviation was observed
ENR 1.8.8.3 Adherence to ATC approved Mach number
(A2 - 3.6.2)
Turbo-jet aircraft operating within controlled airspace shall adhere to the Mach number approved by ATC and shall request ATC approval before making any change thereto. If essential to make an immediate temporary change to the Mach number (e.g. due to turbulence), ATC shall be notified as soon as possible that such a change has been made.
If it is not feasible, due to aircraft performance, to maintain the last assigned Mach number during en-route climbs and descents, pilots of aircraft concerned shall advise ATC at the time of the climb/descent request.
ENR 1.8.8.4 Clearances relating to flights subject to maintaining own separation and remaining in visual meteorological conditions (VMC) (A11 - 3.3; P-ATM, 5.9)
Clearances to climb or descend maintaining own separation while in VMC shall not be granted
ENR 1.8.8.5 Oceanic Clearance
A clearance issued by Reykjavik Centre to an aircraft entering Reykjavik CTA becomes effective only at the Reykjavik CTA boundary. It is the responsibility of the pilot to obtain from the appropriate ATC authority any necessary clearance or reclearance to enable him to comply with the oceanic clearance.
ENR 1.8.8.6 Requests for Oceanic Clearance
Aircraft entering the Reykjavik Control Area shall request an oceanic clearance prior to entering the Reykjavik OCA as follows:
  1. On data link in accordance with the document “Reykjavik Data Link Oceanic Clearance Delivery (OCD) Crew Procedures”. The document can be obtained from the ICAO European and North Atlantic (EUR/NAT) office website http://www.icao.int/EURNAT/Pages/welcome.aspx (EUR/NAT Documents → NAT Documents → NAT OPS Bulletins).
  2. From Iceland Radio on HF. HF Frequencies and operational hours are listed in GEN 3.4.4.4.
  3. Aircrews approaching Reykjavik airspace from the Scottish and Stavanger areas can contact Iceland Radio on VHF primary 127.85, secondary 129.625 to obtain their Oceanic Clearance.
Reykjavik cannot issue oceanic clearances until coordination data has been received from the adjacent air traffic control centre and the flight data has been activated within the Reykjavik Flight Data Processing System (FDPS). This occurs a certain time before the aircraft is estimated to enter the Reykjavik CTA and the time interval varies depending on the control area from which the aircraft enters the Reykjavik CTA. The following can be used as guidelines for the crew to determine when the RCL message can be accepted by the Reykjavik FDPS
Aircraft entering the Reykjavik CTA from the following CTASend the RCL when the aircraft is less than this many minutes from the Reykjavik CTA Entry Point
Stavanger 25 minutes
Scottish 25 minutes
Edmonton 45 minutes
Murmansk 30 minutes
Rule of thumb: Send RCL when 20-25 minutes from the Entry Point.
Aircraft that are not data link equipped and are unable to contact Iceland Radio on HF/VHF should request the ATC authority for the airspace in which they are operating to relay their request for Oceanic Clearance to Reykjavík Centre. Pilots should always endeavour to obtain Oceanic Clearance prior to entering Reykjavik OCA; however if any difficulty is encountered the pilot should not hold while awaiting Clearance unless so directed by ATC. In such circumstances, pending receipt of the Oceanic Clearance, the aircraft should continue to maintain the flight level cleared by the current control authority.
Aircraft obtaining an oceanic clearance from Iceland Radio on HF/VHF should also maintain communication with the ATC authority for the airspace in which they are operating.
Oceanic clearances via NAT Tracks: Reykjavik OACC will issue oceanic clearances for NAT tracks using the track letter without the current NAT Track message identification number (TMI).
Example of ATC issued clearance TMA159 is cleared to Washington via track Bravo from RATSU maintain Flight Level Three Four Zero, Mach decimal eight four.
Pilots are expected to include the NAT Track message identifier (TMI) number in the read back of the Oceanic clearance.
Example of pilot read back: TMA159 is cleared to Washington via track Bravo 283 from RATSU maintain Flight Level Three Four Zero, Mach decimal eight four.
If the Track message ident number is included in the read back there is no requirement for the pilot to read back the NAT Track co-ordinates.
If any doubt exists as to the Track message ident or the NAT Track co-ordinates the pilot should request the full Track co-ordinates.
Similarly if the pilot cannot correctly identify the Track message identification, the NAT Track co-ordinates will be read in full and a read back of those co-ordinates are required.
Aircraft departing BIKF or BIRK. To expedite the climb to optimal level, pilots are to confirm their requested enroute FL when requesting their oceanic clearance from the GND on VHF.

ENR 1.8.9 Separation of Aircraft in Reykjavík Control Area (BIRD CTA)

ENR 1.8.9.1 Lateral separation (P-ATM, 5.4.1 and 5.11)
ENR 1.8.9.1.1 Minimum lateral separation shall be:
  1. 23 NM between aircraft which are;
    1. RNP4 approved;
    2. Automated Dependent Surveillance-Contract (ADS- C) equipped;
    3. Controller-pilot data link communications (CPDLC) equipped;
    4. RCP 240 approved; and
    5. RSP 180 approved
  2. 50 NM between aircraft which are NAT HLA approved provided that a portion of the route of the aircraft is within, above, or below HLA;
  3. 90 NM between aircraft operating outside the HLA and at least one aircraft is not NAT HLA approved between Iceland and points in Scandinavia and in the United Kingdom;
  4. 120 NM between other aircraft; except that lower minima in 5.4.1.2 of the PANS-ATM (Doc 4444) may be applied, or further reduced in accordance with 5.11, where the conditions specified in the relevant PANS-ATM provisions are met (see ENR 1.8.9.4 below).
ENR 1.8.9.1.2 Use of latitude
In the practical application of the minima in 1.8.9.1.1 above, tracks may by spaced with reference to their difference in latitude, using one and one-half degrees instead of 90 NM; and two degrees instead of 120 NM, provided that in any interval of ten degrees longitude the change in latitude of at least one of the tracks does not exceed:
  1. three degrees at or south of 58N;
  2. two degrees north of 58N and south of 70N; and
  3. one degree at or north of 70N and south of 80N.
At or north of 80N, or where the above rates of change of latitude are exceeded, the required lateral separation must be ensured by reference to the track spacing expressed in nautical miles.
ENR 1.8.9.1.3 En-route climbs and descents
The application of lateral separation between aircraft carrying out climbs/descents en-route and other aircraft shall be based on condition that the required separation between the climbing/descending aircraft and other en-route affected aircraft exists at the time a climb/descent clearance is issued and will continue to exist during climb/descent at the recleared flight level(s), unless longitudinal separation is provided.
ENR 1.8.9.1.4 Lateral separation at FL285 and below
Lateral separation used at FL285 and below, in all cases the aircraft must be equipped with GNSS.
  1. Communicating directly with ATC on VHF:
    1. 15 nm between aircraft in level flight
    2. 7 nm lateral separation between aircraft that are climbing/descending through the level of the other aircraft
  2. Any types of communication:

    Lateral separation of 20 NM while one aircraft climbs/descends through the level of another aircraft operating on intersecting and non-intersecting tracks.

ENR 1.8.9.2 Longitudinal separation
(P-ATM, 5.4.2 and 5.11)
ENR 1.8.9.2.1 Subsonic Transport Operations
  1. Minimum longitudinal separation between turbojet aircraft shall be:
    1. 15 minutes; or
    2. 10 minutes, provided the Mach number technique is applied whether in level, climbing or descending flight; and the aircraft concerned have reported over a common point to follow continuously diverging tracks until some other form of separation is provided; and
      1. at least 10 minutes longitudinal separation exists at the point where the tracks diverge; and
      2. at least 5 minutes longitudinal separation will exist where lateral separation is achieved; and
      3. lateral separation will be achieved at or before the next significant point (normally ten degrees of longitude along track(s)) or, if not, within 90 minutes of the time the second aircraft passes the common point or within 600 NM of the common point, whichever is estimated to occur first.
    3. Between 9 and 5 minutes inclusive provided the Mach number technique is applied; and
      1. the aircraft concerned have reported over a common point and follow the same identical track or continuously diverging tracks until some other form of separation is provided; and
      2. the preceding aircraft is maintaining a true Mach number greater than the following aircraft in accordance with the following: - 9 minutes if the preceding aircraft is Mach 0.02 faster than the following aircraft. - 8 minutes if the preceding aircraft is Mach 0.03 faster than the following aircraft. - 7 minutes if the preceding aircraft is Mach 0.04 faster than the following aircraft. - 6 minutes if the preceding aircraft is Mach 0.05 faster than the following aircraft. - 5 minutes if the preceding aircraft is Mach 0.06 faster than the following aircraft.
      3. if the aircraft have not reported over a common point, it is possible to ensure, by an ATS surveillance system, that the appropriate time interval will exist at the common point from which they either follow the same track or continuously diverging tracks.
  2. 5 minutes between aircraft which are;
    1. RNP4 approved;
    2. Automated Dependent Surveillance-Contract (ADS- C) equipped;
    3. Controller-pilot data link communications (CPDLC) equipped;
    4. RCP 240 approved; and
    5. RSP 180 approved.
  3. Minimum longitudinal separation between non-turbo-jet aircraft shall be:
    1. 30 minutes; and
    2. 15 minutes if the aircraft are equipped with GNSS and are communicating via VHF
Note - The minima contained in 1.8.9.2.1.1 b are in addition to those found in the PANS-ATM (Doc 4444), 5.4.2.4, Longitudinal separation minima with Mach number technique based on time.
ENR 1.8.9.2.2 En-route climbs and descents
The application of longitudinal separation between aircraft carrying out climbs/descents en route and other aircraft operating in the same direction shall be based on condition that the required separation between the climbing/descending aircraft and other en-route affected aircraft exists at the time a climb/descent clearance is issued and will continue to exist during climb/descent at the recleared flight level(s), unless lateral separation is provided.
Note - application of longitudinal separation between climbing/descending aircraft when Mach number technique is used is based on the assumption that the last assigned Mach number will be maintained during en-route climbs and descents. In the event that it is not feasible to do so, pilots of aircraft concerned must inform ATC at the time of the climb/decent request or clearance.
5 minutes longitudinal separation between GNSS equipped aircraft climbing or descending aircraft while vertical separation does not exist provided:
  1. The level change is commenced within 10 minutes of the time the second aircraft has reported over a common point; and
  2. The vertical separation at the time of commencement of change is 4000 feet or less; and
  3. When issuing the clearance through third party communication or CPDLC, a restriction must be added to the clearance to ensure that the 10 minute conditions satisfied. This shall be achieved by including a restriction to reach a vertically separated flight level within 10 minutes from the time the second aircraft has reported over the common point.
ENR 1.8.9.2.3 Longitudinal separation at FL285 and below
Longitudinal separation used at FL285 and below, in all cases the aircraft must be equipped with GNSS and communicating directly with ATC on VHF:
  1. 10 minutes,
  2. 20 nm between aircraft operating on tracks that intersect at 0-90 degree angle,
  3. 10 nm between aircraft operating on tracks that intersect at 0-90 degree angle provided that the leading aircraft maintains a true airspeed of 20 kt. or more faster than the succeeding aircraft,
  4. 10 nm between aircraft operating on tracks that intersect at 0-90 degree angle while one aircraft climbs/descends provided that the other aircraft maintains a level while vertical separation does not exist.
ENR 1.8.9.3 Vertical separation
Between FL 290 and FL 410 inclusive, 1000 ft (300 m) vertical separation can be applied in the NAT Region.
ENR 1.8.9.4 Information on application of separation minima (NAT Doc 008)
Where, circumstances permitting, separation minima lower than those specified in 1.8.9.1 and 1.8.9.2 will be applied in accordance with PANS-ATM, appropriate information should be published in Aeronautical Information Publications so that users of the airspace are fully aware of the portions of the airspace where the reduced separation minima will be applied and of the navigation aids on the use of which those minima area based.
ENR 1.8.9.5 Horizontal separation minima relating to airspace reservations
ENR 1.8.9.5.1 Separation minima between moving temporary reservations
  1. Lateral separation shall be:
    1. 60 NM (110 km) between the closest tracks of any aircraft for which the airspace is reserved, provided all aircraft or formation flights meet the HLA MNPS; or
    2. 120 NM (223 km) between the closest tracks of any aircraft for which the airspace is reserved, except that in the New York OCA west of 60°W, 90 NM (167 km) may be applied.
    Note - A formation flight with at least one of the aircraft in the formation meeting the HLA MNPS is deemed to meet the requirement for the application of 60 NM (110 km) in a.
  2. Longitudinal separation shall be 60 minutes.
ENR 1.8.9.5.2 Separation minima between stationary temporary airspace reservations
  1. Lateral separation shall be:
    1. 60 NM (110 km) between the boundaries of stationary temporary airspace reservations, provided the requesting agencies have guaranteed to confine their activities to the requested airspace, except that in the New York OCA west of 60W, 45 NM (84 km) may be applied; or
    2. 120 NM (223 km) between the boundaries of the airspace reservations, if no guarantees have been given, except in the New York OCA west of 60°W, 90 NM (167 km) may be applied.
ENR 1.8.9.5.3 Separation minima between moving temporary airspace reservations and other aircraft
  1. Lateral separation shall be:
    1. 60 NM (110 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned and the closest track of any other aircraft for which the airspace is reserved, provided all aircraft meet the HLA MNPS requirements and a portion of the route of the aircraft is within, above or below HLA; or
    2. 60 NM (110 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned and the track of a formation flight for which the airspace has been reserved, provided at least one aircraft in the formation and the aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit meet the HLA MNPS requirements and a portion of the route of the aircraft is within, above or below HLA; or
    3. 120 NM (223 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned and the closest track of any of the aircraft for which the airspace is reserved, except that in New York OCA west of 60W, 90 NM (167 km) may be applied.
ENR 1.8.9.5.4 Separation minima between stationary temporary airspace reservations and other aircraft
  1. Lateral separation shall be:
    1. 30 NM (56 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned or as part of a moving airspace reservation and the nearest limit of the reserved airspace, provided the aircraft meets the HLA MNPS requirements and a portion of the route of the aircraft is within, above or below HLA and the requesting agency has guaranteed to confine its activities to the requested airspace; or
    2. 60 NM(110 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned or as part of a moving airspace reservation and the nearest limit of the reserved airspace, provided the aircraft meets the HLA MNPS requirements and a portion of the route of the aircraft is within, above or below HLA and the requesting agency has not guaranteed to confine its activities to the requested airspace; or
    3. 60 NM (110 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned or as part of a moving airspace reservation and the nearest limit of the reserved airspace, when the aircraft does not meet the HLA MNPS requirements and the requesting agency has guaranteed to confine its activities to the requested airspace, except that in New York OCA west of 60W 45 NM (84 km) may be applied; or
    4. 120 NM (223 km) between the track of an aircraft operating under the control of the ATC unit concerned or as part of a moving airspace reservation and the nearest limit of the reserved airspace, when the aircraft does not meet the HLA MNPS requirements and the requesting agency has not guaranteed to confine its activities to the requested airspace, except that in New York OCA west of 60W 90 NM (167 km) may be applied.
ENR 1.8.9.6 Application of reduced separation minima (NAT Doc 008)
Separation in accordance with PANS-ATM may be applied for flights in direct Controller Pilot Communication (DCPC) that are;
  1. within the Domestic Sector,
  2. within the Oceanic Sector utilizing and within reliable reception distance of a radio navigation aids in Iceland.
Note 1- Separation based on ATS Surveillance system may be applied within coverage of ATS Surveillance systems in BIRD CTA.
Aircraft traversing the boundary of Gander and Reykjavik CTAs, for which reduced lateral separation is applied, will be accepted by the receiving centre provided aircraft are diverging and will continue to diverge until another form of separation is established.

ENR 1.8.10 SSR and ADS-B

(P-ATM Chapter 8, P-OPS, Vol 1, Section III)
ENR 1.8.10.1 Carriage and operation of pressure-altitude reporting SSR transponder
All aircraft operating as IFR flights in the NAT Region shall be equipped with a pressure-altitude reporting SSR transponder.
ENR 1.8.10.2 Carriage and operation of 1 090 MHz extended squitter (1090ES) Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast equipment
An aircraft carrying 1090 MHz extended squitter (1090ES) ADS-B equipment shall disable ADS-B transmission unless:..
a) the aircraft emits position information of an accuracy and integrity consistent with the transmitted values of the position quality indicator; or
Note - The following documents provide guidance for the installation and airworthiness approval of ADS-B OUT system in aircraft and ensure compliance with a) above:
  1. European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AMC 20-24; or
  2. FAA AC No. 20-165A - Airworthiness Approval of ADS-B; or
  3. Configuration standards reflected in Appendix XI of Civil Aviation Order 20.18 of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority of Australia.
b) the aircraft always transmits a value of 0 (zero) for one or more of the position quality indicators (NUCp, NIC, NAC or SIL), when the requirements of a) above cannot be met; or
c) the operator has received an exemption granted by Isavia
Note - Aircraft operators wishing to receive an exemption from the procedures specified above for an individual flight shall apply for an exemption to Isavia at least 5 days in advance of the flight. Any approvals for such exemptions may be contingent on specific conditions such as routing, flight level and time of day. Applications for exemptions shall be sent to Isavia at e-mail address acc@isavia.is.
ENR 1.8.10.2.1 Operation of transponders
ENR 1.8.10.2.1.1 SSR transponders
  1. Unless otherwise directed by ATC, pilots of aircraft equipped with SSR flying in NAT flight information regions shall retain the last assigned identity (Mode A) code for period of 30 minutes after entry into NAT airspace and operate using the identity (Mode A) code 2000 after this period. Note - This procedure does not affect the requirement for continuous operation of Mode C (when serviceable equipment is carried) or the use of the special purpose codes (7500, 7600, 7700) in cases of unlawful interference, radio failure, interception or emergency.
  2. When it is necessary to stop IFF/SIF transponders from replying on Mode A/3, pilots shall be requested to switch off Mode 3 (see 1.8.10.5.1 “STOP SQUAWK THREE”). In no case shall they be requested to switch to STANDBY, since operation of the STANDBY switch stops the IFF/SIF transponder from replying on all modes.
Note - Some military aircraft are required to operate IFF transponders for non air traffic control purposes simultaneously with and independently of their operation in mode A for air traffic control purposes.
ENR 1.8.10.2.1.2 ADS-B transmitters
  1. Aircraft equipped with ADS-B having an aircraft identification feature shall transmit the aircraft identification as specified in Item 7 of the ICAO flight plan or, when no flight plan has been filed, the aircraft registration.
  2. Whenever it is observed on the situation display that the aircraft identification transmitted by an ADS-B equipped aircraft is different from that expected from the aircraft, the pilot shall be requested to confirm and, if necessary, re-enter the correct aircraft identification.
  3. Most ADS-B transmitters (DO-260 compliant ADS-B transmitters) incorporate a single emergency bit for the squawk codes 7500, 7600 and 7700 and therefore do not indicate the nature of the emergency. Thus when activated, the pilot will need to contact ATC to communicate the type of emergency.
Such ADS-B transmitters are also unable to squawk ident while the general emergency mode is being transmitted. Other ADS-B transmitters operate the emergency and/or urgency mode as follows:
  1. emergency;
  2. communication failure;
  3. unlawful interference;
  4. minimum fuel; and/or
  5. medical.
ENR 1.8.10.2.2 Operation of SSR/ADS-B equipment and displays
  1. SSR derived information shall be checked by use of special monitoring devices, or by correlation of an identified primary radar blip with the appropriate SSR response.
  2. Downlinked ADS-B data shall not be used by the ATC system for determining aircraft position when any of the position quality indicators (NUCp, NIC, NAC or SIL) have a value of 0 (zero)
  3. The “all codes” setting shall be used when it is desired to display for air traffic control purposes all aircraft in a specified area that are equipped with SSR or IFF/SIF transponders; the “all aircraft” setting shall be used when it is desired to display also aircraft equipped with basic IFF transponders.
ENR 1.8.10.3 SSR and ADS-B Phraseology (P-ATM. 12.4.3)
Phrase
SQUAWK [(code)] [AND] IDENTTo request the operation of the ident feature
TRANSMIT ADS-B IDENTTo request the operation of the ident feature
IDENTIFIEDIdentification of aircraft
IDENTIFICATION TERMINATEDTermination of radar and/or ADS-B service
RE-ENTER [ADS-B or MODE S] AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATIONTo request reselection of aircraft identification
SQUAWK LOWTurn master control to "low" sensitivity position, retaining present mode and code.
SQUAWK NORMALTurn master control to "normal" position, retaining present mode and code.

ENR 1.8.11 Special Procedures Applicable in Designated Airspace

ENR 1.8.11.1 Establishment and use of organized track system (OTS)
  1. When necessary in order to permit the optimum use of the airspace, the appropriate Oceanic Area Centre constructs the OTS after determination of basic minimum time tracks; with due consideration of airlines' preferred routes and taking into account airspace restrictions such as danger areas and military airspace reservations. The night-time OTS is produced by Gander OAC and the day-time OTS by Shanwick OAC (Prestwick), each incorporating any requirement for tracks within the New York, Reykjavik, Bodø and Santa Maria Oceanic Control Areas (OCAs).
    OAC planners co-ordinate with adjacent OACs and domestic ATC agencies to ensure that the proposed system is viable. They also take into account the requirements of opposite direction traffic and ensure that sufficient track/flight level profiles are provided to satisfy anticipated traffic demand. The impact on domestic route structures and the serviceability of transition area radars and navaids are checked before the system is finalised.
    1. Operators conducting scheduled or non-scheduled flight operations at or above FL 280 within Gander Oceanic, New York Oceanic, Shanwick Oceanic and Santa Maria (north of 30°N) Oceanic control areas shall provide information to the area control centres concerned regarding the tracks likely to be requested by turbo-jet aircraft during peak traffic period. Such information shall be provided as far in advance of the anticipated peak periods as practicable and as specified in appropriate aeronautical information publications.
    2. Based on the above information an organized track system may be established. The location of the organized tracks will depend on traffic demand and other relevant factors. The related organized track messages will be disseminated to operators by Shanwick Oceanic Area Control Centre for the predominant westbound flow of air traffic and by Gander Oceanic Area Control Centre for the predominant eastbound flow of air traffic. These messages shall be disseminated at least three hours in advance of each anticipated peak traffic period. Any subsequent change made to the track system shall be notified to the operators as soon as possible.
ENR 1.8.11.2 Mandatory carriage of OTS message
All aircraft operating in or above HLA shall carry a copy of the current OTS message.
ENR 1.8.11.3 Establishment and use of organized tracks for supersonic aircraft operations
Where appropriate, an organized track system may be promulgated for supersonic aircraft operations. When promulgating such an organized track system the requirements for position reporting and the applicability of abbreviated position reports shall be included.
ENR 1.8.11.4 Special procedures for flights along the northern or southern boundaries of Gander Oceanic and Shanwick Oceanic flight information regions
Aircraft operating along tracks through successive points situated on the northern or southern boundaries of Gander Oceanic and Shanwick Oceanic flight information regions shall be provided with air traffic services by Gander or Shanwick area control centres as appropriate.
ENR 1.8.11.5 Special procedures for flights along the southern boundary of Reykjavík FIR/CTA
Aircraft operating along tracks through successive points situated on the southern boundary of Reykjavík FIR/CTA shall be provided with air traffic services by:
  1. Reykjavik OACC, at and east of 10W, (except for Helicopter Operating Area),
  2. Shanwick and Gander OACCs, as appropriate, west of 10W.
Note - See Helicopter Operating Area, ENR 2.2
ENR 1.8.11.6 Special procedures for manned balloon flights
  1. Manned balloon flights authorized to operate in the NAT Region shall operate outside NAT HLA;
  2. Within the NAT Region, manned balloons shall have a communications capability in accordance with Annex 2.
ENR 1.8.11.7 Airborne collision avoidance systems (ACAS)
Turbine-engined aircraft having a maximum certificated take-off mass exceeding 5,700 kg or authorized to carry more than 19 passengers are required to carry ACAS II in the Reykjavik CTA/FIR. The technical specifications for ACAS II are contained in ICAO Annex 10 Volume IV. Compliance with this requirement can be achieved through the implementation of traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) Version 7.1 as specified in RTCA/DO-185B or EUROCAE/ED-143.
Flight crews should report all ACAS/TCAS Resolution Advisories which occur in the NAT region to the controlling authority for the airspace involved.
ENR 1.8.11.8 Strategic Lateral Offset Procedure (SLOP) within NAT airspace
The Strategic Lateral Offset Procedure is now a standard operating procedure throughout the North Atlantic (NAT) Region. This procedure mitigates collision risk and wake turbulence encounters. Pilots conducting oceanic flight within the NAT Region with automatic offset programming capability are recommended to fly centreline or 1 or 2 NM right of centre line.
Aircraft shall not apply SLOP below F285 in the Reykjavik CTA.
The introduction of very accurate aircraft navigation systems, along with sophisticated flight management systems, has drastically reduced the number of risk bearing lateral navigation errors reported in NAT airspace. Paradoxically, the capability of aircraft to navigate to such a high level of accuracy has led to a situation where aircraft on the same track but at different levels, are increasingly likely to be in lateral overlap. This results in an increased risk of collisions if an aircraft departs from its cleared level for any reason.
SLOP reduces the risk by distributing aircraft laterally. It is applicable within the New York Oceanic, Gander Oceanic, Shanwick Oceanic, Santa Maria Oceanic, Nuuk and Reykjavik flight information regions, and within the Bodo Oceanic flight information region when flights are operated more than 185 km (100 NM) seaward from the shoreline.
ENR 1.8.11.8.1
SLOP conforms to direction in the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Procedures for Air Navigation Services - Air Traffic Management (PANS-ATM, doc 4444, 16.5) and is subject to the following guidelines:
  1. Aircraft without automatic offset programming capability must fly the centre line.
  2. Operators capable of programming automatic offsets may fly the centre line or offset one or two nautical miles right of centre line allowing for 3 possible positions along route. Offsets are not to exceed 2 NM right of centre line and offsets to the left of centre line are not permitted. An aircraft overtaking another aircraft should offset within the confines of this procedure, if capable, so as to create the least amount of wake turbulence for the aircraft being overtaken. The pilot should take into account wind and estimated wake vortex drift and time to descend. (Nominal descend rates for wakes are 300 - 600 fpm).
  3. Pilots should use whatever means is available (e.g. TCAS, communications, visual acquisition) to determine the best flight path to fly. Pilots may contact other aircraft on frequency 123.45, as necessary, to coordinate the best wake turbulence offset option.
  4. Pilots may apply an offset outbound after the oceanic entry point and must return to centre line before the oceanic exit point. Position reports transmitted via voice should be based on the waypoints of the current ATC clearance and not the offset position.
  5. Aircraft transiting oceanic ATS Surveillancer areas may remain on their established offset positions.
  6. There is no ATC clearance required for this procedure and it is not necessary that ATC be advised.

ENR 1.8.12 Flight Information Service

ENR 1.8.12.1 Information on runway conditions
(A11 - 4.2.1; P-ATM, 6.6)
  1. Unless otherwise provided, the unit providing flight information service or approach service as applicable shall have available for transmission to aircraft on request, immediately prior to descent, information on the prevailing runway conditions at the aerodrome of intended landing.
ENR 1.8.12.2 Transmission of SIGMET information
(P-ATM, 9.1.3.2)
SIGMET information shall be transmitted to aircraft by VOLMET broadcast, by a general call to a group of aircraft, or by directed transmissions to individual aircraft, as determined by the appropriate area control centre according to the circumstances, bearing in mind the need to ensure timely receipt of the information by the aircraft and to keep the load on the HF en-route communication channels to a minimum.
SIGMET information passed to aircraft shall cover a portion of the route up to two hours' flying time ahead of the aircraft.
ENR 1.8.12.3 Transmission of amended aerodrome forecast
(P-ATM, 9.1.3)
Amended aerodrome forecasts shall be passed to aircraft within 60 minutes from the aerodrome of destination, unless the information has been made available through other means.

ENR 1.8.13 Air Traffic Services Messages

ENR 1.8.13.1 Flight plan and departure messages
(P-ATM, 11.3.3 and 11.4.2.2)
Filed flight plan messages for flights intending to operate within the NAT Region at a distance of 60 NM or less from the northern and southern boundaries of Gander Oceanic and Shanwick Oceanic flight information regions, shall be addressed to the area control centres in charge of the NAT flight information regions along the route and, in addition, to the area control centres in charge of nearest adjacent NAT flight information regions.
For flights departing from points within adjacent regions and entering the NAT Region without intermediate stops, filed flight plan messages shall be transmitted to the appropriate area control centres immediately after the flight plan has been submitted.

ENR 1.8.14 Alerting and Search and Rescue Services

ENR 1.8.14.1 Routes and equipment of private aircraft
(A6, Part I - Chapter 6)
General aviation aircraft shall:
  1. carry appropriate survival equipment;
  2. be equipped with functioning two-way radio communications equipment except that, under special local circumstances, the appropriate authorities may grant exemption from this requirement.
ENR 1.8.14.2 Alerting services
(P-ATM, 9.2)
Alerting service is provided:
  1. for all aircraft provided with air traffic control service;
  2. in so far as practicable, to all other aircraft having filed a flight plan or otherwise known to the air traffic services; and
  3. to any aircraft known or believed to be the subject of unlawful interference.